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Dermatology   Ophthalmology   Exotic Pets   Dentistry  
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Home / PROFESSION / Edutainment /     
 
Dermatology
Shorthair cat with crusty, non pruritic lesions - Part 1
DER211   Author: Dr. Stefanie Peters
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A 4 year-old female spayed Domestic Shorthair cat is presented as an emergency. The owner reports that about one week ago crusty, non pruritic lesions were noted around both eyes, on the pinnae on an on the bridge of the nose (picture 1 and 2). The veterinarian diagnosed a herpes virus infection together with a dermatophytosis (due to Mikrosporum canis) by looking at the cat without further diagnostics. She gave a paramunity inducer and two amoxicilline injections. Since the cat showed no improvement, she recommended euthanasia. The owner asks for a second opinion (yours). The cat has subfebrile temperature, her general health is markedly reduced and she is slightly exsiccotic. The owner tells you she had not eaten since the beginning of the disease and drunk nothing for 2 days now. The animal is an indoor cat (apartment in a flat), the second cat and the owners have no problems.
How would you proceed?
a) You confirm the diagnosis of your colleague and recommend euthanasia.
b) Crusty lesions on face and pinnae are classical signs of notoedres mange. You start an ivermectin therapy.
c) These skin lesions are caused by an extraordinary aggressive Microsporum canis strain. You take samples for fungal culture and send the owners home with griseofulvin tablets which should be given with fatty food twice daily.
d) You are sure this is a real emergency which requires intensive therapy. You recommend hospitalisation for intensive care and explain your diagnostic plan.
 





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