Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Pyothorax in dogs - clinical signs, diagnosis and therapeutic recommendations
Clinical presentation of canine pyothorax can be delayed and nonspecific. Fever, dyspnea and weight loss are the most common and often non diagnostic physical examination findings.

Diagnosis is made with radiographic findings and analysis of aspirated pleural fluid. Pleural infections have a high prevalence of polymicrobic infections. The diagnosis of pyothorax is made by cytologic evaluation and culture of pleural fluid.
Eighty percent of specimens from dogs with anaerobic infections contain both obligate anaerobes and aerobic bacteria. Antibiotic therapy without drainage and lavage is ineffective for pyothorax. Mortality is higher in patients treated with multiple thoracocenteses and antibiotics than in those treated with tube thoracostomy.

Excessive delays in treatment can result in serious pulmonary dysfunction and may necessitate surgical intervention.

Prognosis for canine pyothorax is fair to good with early diagnosis and aggressive medical and/or surgical treatment. Working dogs appear to be more predisposed to developing pyothorax secondary to grass awn migration.


Source: Scott, J. A.; Macintire, D. K. (2003): Canine Pyothorax: Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Treatment. In: Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine
Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practising Veterinarian, 2003, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 180-195






Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Complex atlanto-axial malformation in a rabbitmembers
A 1-year-old dwarf rabbit was presented with sub-acute progressive tetraparesis. Radiography, CT and MRI revealed compressive cervical myelopathy secondary to a complex atlanto-axial malformation including partial aplasia of the atlantal dorsal arch, dens malformation, malarticulation and lateral atlanto-occipital displacement. What should be done next?

  • Predicting histopathological classification of canine mammary carcinomas via sonography
  • Fluorescein sodium-guided resection of intracranial lesions in dogsmembers
  • Ultrasound and clinical findings in cats with urethral obstructionmembers
  • Novel technique to measure plasma lipids in diabetic dogsmembers
  • Prevalence and disease associations in feline thrombocytopeniamembers
  • Optic neuritis in dogs: an updatemembers
  • Brachycephalic airway syndrome - differences between pugs and French bulldogsmembers
  • Prognostic factors in cats with HCMmembers
  • Ureteral Papilla Implantation in Cats Undergoing Renal Transplantationmembers
  • Storage lesion in canine packed erythrocytesmembers
  • Drug-induced infiltrative lung disease with cytarabine and prednisonemembers
  • Laparoscopic-assisted Gastropexy and the Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved