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Update to bovine salmonellosis in Germany
Bird flu is the very important infectious disease which is discussed a lot currently. But one must not forget that there are other important and already endemic infectious diseases in Germany. This new update regarding bovine salmonellosis focuses on one of these diseases - and gives a lot of new informations.

Bases for the data presented are the information of the officially confirmed outbreaks of salmonellosis in cattle collected in the National Animal Disease Reporting System since 1995.

From 1995 to 2003 the number of annually registered outbreaks of salmonellosis in cattle in Germany amounted on an average to 221,2 +/- 26,5.
Because of the decrease in cattle population in this period the number of reported outbreaks of salmonellosis increased significantly (P < or =) in ratio to the number of cattle keeping farms.

In Germany, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhimurium var. copenhagen caused approximately 50 % of the annually reported outbreaks of bovine salmonellosis between 1995 and 2002 and therefore represent the most important serovars.

The cattle adapted Salmonella serovar Dublin was responsible for about 15 % to 20 % of the outbreaks from 1995-2000, afterwards its share increased continuously to 38 % in 2003.

Between 1995 and 2003 Salmonella Abony was the causative agent of 7 % to 21 % and Salmonella Enteritidis very constantly of 5 % to 6 % of the annual outbreaks.
Numerous other serovars also may cause outbreaks of bovine salmonellosis, however, that were mostly single cases which did not result in further outbreaks in other years of the period observed.

The temporal distribution of the reported cases of salmonellosis reveals a strong correspondence over the years.

The lowest number of new cases is registered annually in months April/ May. Afterwards the number of outbreaks increases steadily until September/ October, followed by an decrease in the monthly reported cases of salmonellosis in cattle.



Source: Methner U. (2005): Situation of bovine salmonellosis in Germany from 1995-2003 according to the data from the National Animal Disease Reporting System. In: Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2005 Nov-Dec;118(11-12):449-55.




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BOVINE

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