Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Effectiveness of fluoxetine in urine spraying cats
Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has been used in human medicine for many years. In dogs, its mainly used in `psychodermatoses`, especially acral lick granulomas. Does it also modify behaviour in cats?

In a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial, 17 neutered cats > 1 year old with objectionable urine spraying behavior were included. Owners recorded urine-spraying events for 2 weeks (baseline). Cats that vertically marked a mean of > or = 3 times per week were treated for 8 weeks with fluoxetine or fish-flavored liquid placebo. If urine spraying was not reduced by 70% by weeks 4 through 5, the dosage was increased by 50% for weeks 7 and 8. After discontinuation of treatment at the end of 8 weeks, owners recorded daily urine marks for another 4 weeks.
The mean (+/- SE) weekly rate of spraying episodes in treated cats was 8.6 (+/- 2.0) at baseline, decreased significantly by week 2 (1.7 +/- 0.6), and continued to decrease by weeks 7 and 8 (0.4 +/- 0.2). The mean weekly spraying rate of cats receiving placebo was 7.8 (+/- 1.5) at baseline, decreased only slightly during week 1 (5.5 +/- 1.8), and did not decline further.

When treatment was discontinued after 8 weeks, the spraying rate of cats that had received treatment varied. The main adverse reaction to the drug was a reduction in food intake, which was observed in 4 of 9 treated cats.

Administration of fluoxetine hydrochloride for treatment of urine spraying in cats can be expected to considerably reduce the rate of urine marking. The frequency of spraying before treatment is predictive of the spraying rate when the drug is discontinued.

Source: Pryor PA, Hart BL, Cliff KD, Bain MJ. (2001): Effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on urine spraying behavior in cats. In:
J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001 Dec 1;219(11):1557-61




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
The objective of this pilot study was to describe the application and first preliminary data of a novel MRI and CT compatible patient-specific facemask for stereotactic brain biopsy of intracranial lesions in dogs. Five client-owned dogs presenting for neurological deficits consistent with forebrain disease were included in the study. All dogs had MRI findings consistent with an intracranial lesion. But biopsies in this region are not easy to obtain. Does an individual face mask help?

  • RET-He to diagnose iron-deficient erythropoiesis in dogsmembers
  • Hypertriglyceridemia-Associated Proteinuria in Miniature Schnauzersmembers
  • Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill animalsmembers
  • Disorder of sex development in a cat with chromosome mosaicism members
  • Generalized discoid lupus erythematosus in dogs members
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in dogsmembers
  • Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in American Brussels Griffon Dogsmembers
  • Efficacy and Potential Complications of Transjugular Liver Biopsymembers
  • Hypomagnesemia in Brachycephalic Dogsmembers
  • Comparison of two minimally invasive techniques for liver biopsy members
  • Topical aqueous sirolimus and the tear production members
  • JAK 1/2 inhibitor in the treatment of canine B-cell lymphomamembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved