Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Gonadectomy-induced Adrenocortical Neoplasia in the Domestic Ferret
Ferrets have become very popular pets over the last few years and so are more and more seen in the small animal practice. These animals have some very special diseases, like adrenocortcial neoplasias leading to cushing-like signs. But who exspects that such a neoplasia can be induced by castration? A fascinating review article!

Sex steroid–producing adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas occur frequently in neutered ferrets, but the molecular events underlying tumor development are not well understood.

Prepubertal gonadectomy elicits similar tumors in certain inbred or genetically engineered strains of mice, and these mouse models shed light on tumorigenesis in ferrets.

In mice and ferrets, the neoplastic adrenocortical cells, which functionally resemble gonadal steroidogenic cells, arise from progenitors in the subcapsular or juxtamedullary region.

Tumorigenesis in mice is influenced by the inherent susceptibility of adrenal tissue to gonadectomy-induced hormonal changes.

The chronic elevation in circulating luteinizing hormone that follows ovariectomy or orchiectomy is a prerequisite for neoplastic transformation. Gonadectomy alters the plasma or local concentrations of steroid hormones and other factors that affect adrenocortical tumor development, including inhibins, activins, and Müllerian inhibiting substance.

GATA-4 immunoreactivity is a hallmark of neoplastic transformation, and this transcription factor might serve to integrate intracellular signals evoked by different hormones.

Synergistic interactions among GATA-4, steroidogenic factor-1, and other transcription factors enhance expression of inhibin- and genes critical for ectopic sex steroid production, such as cytochrome P450 17-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase and aromatase.

Cases of human adrenocortical neoplasia have been linked to precocious expression of hormone receptors and to mutations that alter the activity of G-proteins or downstream effectors.

Whether such genetic changes contribute to tissue susceptibility to neoplasia in neutered ferrets and mice awaits further study.



Source: M. Bielinska, S. Kiiveri, H. Parviainen, S. Mannisto, M. Heikinheimo and D. B. Wilson (2006):
Gonadectomy-induced Adrenocortical Neoplasia in the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and Laboratory Mouse. In: Vet Pathol 43:97-117 (2006)


Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury
Open fractures are characterized by disruption of the skin and soft tissue, which allows for microbial contamination and colonization. Preventing infection‐related complications of open fractures and other acute wounds remains an evolving challenge due to an incomplete understanding of how microbial colonization and contamination influence healing and outcomes. Culture‐independent molecular methods are now widely used to study human‐associated microbial communities without introducing culture biases. This recently online published study describes the fascinating association between the mechanism of injury and the microbiota of the wounds.

  • Variability of SDMA in apparently healthy dogsmembers
  • Bioavailability of suppository acetaminophen in dogsmembers
  • Computed tomographic lymphography for lymph node staging in dogs with malignant tumors members
  • Characterization of ocular melanosis-affected canine melanocytesmembers
  • Nasopharyngeal sialoceles in brachycephalic dogsmembers
  • Enterococcus faecium SF68 on serum cobalamin and folate concentrationsmembers
  • Gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia limited to the mesentery in a catmembers
  • Ion acid-base disturbances and associated mortality in dogsmembers
  • First description of ultrasonic bone curette in canine otic surgerymembers
  • Staining hair samples with a modified Wright-Giemsa stain to diagnose feline dermatophytosismembers
  • Oral extended release hydrocodone as analgesia after TPLOmembers
  • 25OH vitamin D3 serum concentration in dogs with acute polyradiculoneuritismembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved