Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Gastrocutaneous fistula in a dog
A non-healing wound at the caudal thorax wall in a middle-aged dog. Of course a fistula caused by a foreign body is one of the most likely differentials. But in this dog, the foreign body came from the stomach, and just its removal was not enough. A very informative case report!

A six-year-old, female Tibetan terrier was referred for investigation of a non-healing wound on the left caudal thorax.

A subcutaneous swelling had initially developed on the chest wall, followed by a draining tract from which seropurulent fluid drained for two months. There had been no response to antibiotic treatment.

Following radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations, a bone sequestrum from a fractured rib or a foreign body was suspected.

Surgical exploration of the wound identified a sinus tract and a wooden foreign body (an ice-lolly stick) was located in subcutaneous tissues.

Partial wound dehiscence of the surgical site occurred postoperatively, but healed after 10 days.

One month later, fluid began to discharge from the area again.

Further surgical exploration confirmed a gastrocutaneous fistula. Dissection of the fistula and surgical closure of the stomach, body wall and skin led to resolution of all signs.


Source: Brennan SF, Connery N, Tobin E, Mooney CT, Jones BR. (2004): Gastrocutaneous fistula as a result of migration of a foreign body in a dog. In: J Small Anim Pract. 2004 Jun;45(6):304-6.



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Reference intervals for blood parameters in Shetland Sheepdogsmembers
Several breeds have physiological peculiarities that induce variations in reference intervals (RIs) compared with the general canine population. Shetland sheepdogs (SSs) are reported to be more predisposed to different diseases (eg, hyperlipidemia, gallbladder mucocele, and hypothyroidism). Consequently, a breed‐specific approach is more often required. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether the RIs of the general canine population could be applied to that of SSs, and to generate breed‐specific RIs, where appropriate.

  • Metastasis of a well differentiated perianal gland tumor
  • Punica granatum associated with hepatotoxicosis in cattlemembers
  • Toceranib phosphate (Palladia®) in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumorsmembers
  • Radioactive iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats after rh-TSHmembers
  • Hypoechoic tissue changes in dogs with malignant prostatic lymphomamembers
  • Emphysematous gastritis in dogs and catsmembers
  • Primary pulmonary histiocytic sarcoma in dogsmembers
  • Determining prognosis in canine sepsis members
  • Correlation of plasma and tear glucose, creatinine and urea nitrogen in catsmembers
  • Perineal hernias in dogs - always a bilateral problem?members
  • Pharmacokinetic of gabapentin in catsmembers
  • Follicular development of canine ovaries stimulated by eCG plus hCGmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ] [ Privacy Policy ]

    Copyright © 2001-2018 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved