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No higher incidence of diseases in rescue dogs from September 9th
More than 4 years after September 9th 2001 the University of Pennsylvania gives preliminary results of a still ongoing study in rescue dogs: Do the dogs `working` on Pentagon and World Trade Center show an increased rate of diseases today, especially of clinical signs of nasal or respiratory cancers? A question which is also of enormous interest for men...

`Because of increased metabolic rates, dogs and cats often display early signs of disease when exposed to the same carcinogens as humans,` says Iams Company Veterinarian Dr. Dan Carey, who has tracked the health of the canine participants for the past four years.

`While it`s impossible to form concrete conclusions about human health, this study allows us to track physical changes in the dogs and may provide an early warning of problems that could show up in humans years later.`

Iams partnered with the University of Pennsylvania and the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation to host the five-year study, which uses magnetic resonance imaging to identify early warning signs of health issues, primarily cancer in canine first responders.

The study, which launched in 2002, has been tracking the health of 12 search and rescue dogs that volunteered time in the rescue, recovery and relief missions at Ground Zero and the Pentagon post 9/11.


Source: www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/








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