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Plant extracts in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis
Lots of antipruritic therapies have been tried and described over the last decades to treat atopic dermatitis in dogs. Here is a new multicentric study on more than 100 dogs that have been treated with PYM00217, a proprietary blend of plant extracts - with surprising results!

This study evaluated PYM00217, a proprietary blend of plant extracts, in the management of canine atopic dermatitis (AD).

One hundred and twenty dogs were diagnosed with perennial AD on the basis of history, clinical signs, a positive test for perennial allergens and elimination of other dermatoses.

Exclusion criteria included antimicrobials within 7 days, antihistamines within 14 days, oral/topical glucocorticoids or ciclosporin within 28 days, and parenteral glucocorticoids, essential fatty acids or immunotherapy within 56 days.

Flea control, shampoos and ear cleaners were permitted.

Dogs with a minimum canine atopic dermatitis extent and severity index (CADESI) of 25 were randomly allocated to receive PYM00217 (100, 200 or 400 mg kg1 day1) or placebo for 12 weeks.

The mean reductions in CADESI (intention-to-treat population) were 3.9% (placebo; n = 29), 4.4% (100 mg kg1 day1; n = 30), 23.4% (200 mg kg1 day1; n = 29) and 8.5% (400 mg kg1 day1; n = 29).

The reduction in the 200 mg kg1 day1 group was significant (P < 0.01). For dogs with a baseline CADESI ≥ 50, the mean changes were +10.6% (placebo; n = 12), +0.6% (100 mg kg1 day1; n = 14), −29.3% (200 mg kg1 day1; n = 14) and −3.4% (400 mg kg1 day1; n = 15).

The 200 mg kg1 day1 dose was significantly more effective than placebo (P = 0.038).

No serious adverse effects were reported.

Minor adverse effects seen in 10% (placebo and 100 mg kg1 day1), 24% (200 mg kg1 day1) and 42% (400 mg kg1 day1) of cases were mainly minor gastrointestinal disorders and only five cases required cessation of dosing.
Two dogs (one in each of the 100 mg kg1 day1 and 200 mg kg1 day1 groups) refused to eat the medicated food.

In conclusion, PYM00217 at 200 mg kg1 appears to be an effective, palatable and well-tolerated treatment for canine AD.



Source: Ferguson, Ewan A., Littlewood, Janet D., Carlotti, Didier-Noël, Grover, Rob & Nuttall, Tim (2006): Management of canine atopic dermatitis using the plant extract PYM00217: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. In: Veterinary Dermatology 17 (4), 236-243.




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