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Diacylglycerol for weight reduction in obese dogs
Obesity in dogs and cats have been increasingly recognized in recent years. Because obesity underlies various diseases, pet owners and veterinarians have an important responsibility to help animals lose weight and maintain their health. But as in humans, losing weight is much more difficult than gaining weight. Is diacylglycerol a substance that helps solving this problem? It seems so!

Diet therapy, however, is typically based on limited calorie intake and animals may suffer stress from hunger and this is also a concern to animal owners.
For this reason, many clients drop out of weight control programmes.

In the present study, we focused on dietary diacylglycerol (DAG) as a potentially effective ingredient for canine weight control without caloric restriction.

We replaced a portion of the fat in dog food with either DAG or triacylglycerol (TAG), referred to as DAG or TAG diets here, and fed overweight beagle dogs (body condition score of 4 or higher) with either the DAG or TAG diet for a 6-week period.

Results indicated that, even though the food composition other than fat type were identical, dogs fed the DAG diet showed a statistically significant reduction in body weight averaging a 2.3% reduction within 6 weeks while the TAG-fed dogs maintained their obese body weights.

In addition, the DAG group also showed a reduction in body fat content, serum triglyceride and total cholesterol concentrations.

These results suggest the possibility of developing a pet food using DAG to control weight and serum lipid levels without compromising caloric intake.


Source: Umeda, T., Bauer, J. E. & Otsuji, K. (2006): Weight loss effect of dietary diacylglycerol in obese dogs. In: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 90 (5-6), 208-215.




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury
Open fractures are characterized by disruption of the skin and soft tissue, which allows for microbial contamination and colonization. Preventing infection‐related complications of open fractures and other acute wounds remains an evolving challenge due to an incomplete understanding of how microbial colonization and contamination influence healing and outcomes. Culture‐independent molecular methods are now widely used to study human‐associated microbial communities without introducing culture biases. This recently online published study describes the fascinating association between the mechanism of injury and the microbiota of the wounds.

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