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Cutaneous and mucocutaneous plasmacytomas in dogs
These tumours are not too common but can be very fascinating. This excellent study gives a lot of new insights: Wchich breeds are overrepresented, which localisations are the most common etc. etc. Very interesting and useful for the daily practice.

In this study the clinico-pathological aspects of cutaneous and mucocutaneous plasmacytomas were investigated in 63 dogs (one dog with two tumours).

The tumours were most commonly observed in the skin of the trunk and legs.

Yorkshire Terrier (n = 8) was the most commonly affected breed and males were affected more commonly than females (36 versus 23, respectively).

Plasmacytomas were histologically classified into mature, hyaline, cleaved, asynchronous, monomorphous blastic and polymorphous blastic cell types.

Monomorphous blastic cell type was the most frequent type (n = 21), followed by cleaved (n = 19) and asynchronous (n = 11) cell types. Secondary amyloid depositions were observed in eight cases.

Immunohistochemical staining showed monoclonal lambda light chain positivity in all cases. In the immunohistochemical staining for cyclin D1, which is a prognostic marker in human plasma cell tumours, moderate numbers of positive tumour cells were observed in only one case of (muco)cutaneous plasmacytoma.

All other cases were negative or contained few positive tumour cells.

On the other hand, high numbers of tumorous plasma cells reacted positively with cyclin D1 in three out of six cases of canine multiple myelomas.

Prognosis of the (muco)cutaneous plasmacytomas was good, except in one dog which developed a lymphoma afterwards.

No significant correlations were observed between the cell type and the location of the tumour, presence of amyloid or prognosis.


Source: Cangul IT, Wijnen M, Van Garderen E, van den Ingh TS. (2002): Clinico-pathological aspects of canine cutaneous and mucocutaneous plasmacytomas. In: J Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med. 2002 Aug;49(6):307-12.



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

The expression of Vitamin D receptors in dogs
There is growing evidence linking low blood vitamin D concentration to numerous diseases in people and in dogs. Vitamin D influences cellular function by signaling through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Little is known about which non-skeletal tissues express the VDR or how inflammation influences its expression in the dog.
The objectives of this recently online published study were to define which non-skeletal canine tissues express the VDR and to investigate expression in inflamed small intestine.

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