Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Preoperative radiotherapy in vaccine-induced feline fibrosarcomas
Radical surgical excision with wide margins is the therapy of chocie in feline vaccine-induced fibrosarcomas, and it seems that the combination with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy improves the prognosis. But as this study on nearly 100 cats shows it is worth considering radiotherapy before, not after surgery!

Medical records for 92 cats with a vaccine associated sarcoma receiving preoperative irradiation, with or without chemotherapy, between December 1985 and September 1998 were reviewed.

The purposes were to quantify response to treatment and to attempt identification of factors associated with favorable response.

Variables evaluated for a relationship to outcome included signalment, tumor location, presence of gross vs. microscopic tumor, radiation field size, irradiation technique, type of surgical procedure, completeness of excision, and chemotherapy (none, carboplatin alone, and others).

Time to first event was calculated for the first day of treatment until local tumor recurrence or metastasis, or the date of euthanasia or death.

Median time to first event for all 92 cats was 584 days.

Only completeness of surgical excision was related to the time to first event.

Median time to first event in cats having complete surgical excision was 986 days compared to 292 days for cats with incomplete excision (P = 0.004).

Cats requiring bone removal to effect tumor removal had earlier failure than cats having other types of surgery.

There was not a significant relationship between administration of chemotherapy or chemotherapy type and time to first event although outcome in cats receiving carboplatin was better than all other treatment groups.

Carboplatin addition to preoperative irradiation appears worthy of further study.

Preoperative irradiation is an effective treatment for cats with vaccine associated sarcoma, especially if complete excision can be accomplished following irradiation.




Source: Kobayashi T, Hauck ML, Dodge R, Page RL, Price GS, Williams LE, Hardie EM, Mathews KG, Thrall DE. (2002): Preoperative radiotherapy for vaccine associated sarcoma in 92 cats. In: Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 2002 Sep-Oct;43(5):473-9.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury
Open fractures are characterized by disruption of the skin and soft tissue, which allows for microbial contamination and colonization. Preventing infection‐related complications of open fractures and other acute wounds remains an evolving challenge due to an incomplete understanding of how microbial colonization and contamination influence healing and outcomes. Culture‐independent molecular methods are now widely used to study human‐associated microbial communities without introducing culture biases. This recently online published study describes the fascinating association between the mechanism of injury and the microbiota of the wounds.

  • Variability of SDMA in apparently healthy dogsmembers
  • Bioavailability of suppository acetaminophen in dogsmembers
  • Computed tomographic lymphography for lymph node staging in dogs with malignant tumors members
  • Characterization of ocular melanosis-affected canine melanocytesmembers
  • Nasopharyngeal sialoceles in brachycephalic dogsmembers
  • Enterococcus faecium SF68 on serum cobalamin and folate concentrationsmembers
  • Gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia limited to the mesentery in a catmembers
  • Ion acid-base disturbances and associated mortality in dogsmembers
  • First description of ultrasonic bone curette in canine otic surgerymembers
  • Staining hair samples with a modified Wright-Giemsa stain to diagnose feline dermatophytosismembers
  • Oral extended release hydrocodone as analgesia after TPLOmembers
  • 25OH vitamin D3 serum concentration in dogs with acute polyradiculoneuritismembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved