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Helicobacter pylori-like bacterium in pigs
Helicobacter pylori is blamed for a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms in humans and is also diagnosed in dogs. A related bacterium can cause severe gastroesophageal ulcers in piglets depending from the diet, as this very informative recently published study illustrates.

Groups of gnotobiotic piglets were orally inoculated at 3 days of age with either Helicobacter heilmannii (Hh) or a newly described porcine-origin gastric Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-like bacterium. Three Hh-infected and 6 porcine Hp-like–infected swine were fed a milk replacement diet containing 5–10% (v/v) sterile corn syrup as a dietary source of fermentable carbohydrate.

None of the piglets infected with Hh and supplemented with corn syrup developed gastric mucosal ulcers; 2 developed small erosive lesions in the pars esophagea.

In contrast, all 6 dietary carbohydrate-supplemented Hp-like–infected swine developed severe gastroesophageal ulcers; 1 of these ex-sanguinated into the stomach and died before the end of the experiment.

Four of these 6 piglets had grossly evident partially digested blood in the intestinal lumens, indicative of bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach.

These data suggest that a high carbohydrate diet and gastric colonization by porcine Hp-like bacteria facilitate development of clinically significant gastroesophageal ulcers.



Source: S. Krakowka and J. Ellis (2006): Reproduction of Severe Gastroesophageal Ulcers (GEU) in Gnotobiotic Swine Infected with Porcine Helicobacter pylori-like Bacteria. In: Vet Pathol 43:956-962 (2006)





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SWINE PRACTICE

Enrofloxacin and the porcine livermembers
Enrofloxacin (EF) is a widely used fluoroquinolone, usually regarded as a safe and effective treatment for bacterial infections. Adverse effects of EF have previously been demonstrated in some species, but so far there have been no studies looking specifically at the impact of EF on pigs. In this study, three different doses of EF (5, 25 and 125 mg kg bw−1) were administrated to Bama pigs.

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  • Calibration of the TonoVet and Tono-Pen Vet tonometers in pigs´ eyesmembers
  • Measurement of serum cobalamin and folate concentrations in pigs with commercially assaysmembers


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