Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Nutrient intake and dietary patterns in cats with cardiac disease
Cardiac diseases are less common in cats than in dogs. It is well known that special diets are a problem in many cats, and also that some cardiac diseases benefit from special diet. This interesting prospective study including 95 cats with congenital cardiac disease or primary cardiomyopathy gives important informations regarding this dilemma!

Owners completed a standardized telephone questionnaire regarding their cat`s diet and a 24-hour food recall to determine daily intake of calories, fat, protein, sodium, magnesium, and potassium.

RESULTS: Of the 95 cats, 18 (19%) had a history of congestive heart failure and 73 (77%) had no clinical signs of cardiac disease.

Fifty-five percent (52/95) of cats had concurrent disease.

Inappetance was reported in 38% (36/95) of all cats and in 72% (68/95) of cats with a history of congestive heart failure. Most (57% [54/95]) cats received treats or table scraps on a regular basis.

Approximately half the cats were receiving orally administered medications, supplements, or both.

Only 34% (32/68) of owners used food to administer medications to cats.

Cats consumed more than the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) minimums for protein, sodium, potassium, and magnesium, and nearly all cats consumed more than the AAFCO minimum for fat.
Daily nutrient intake was variable for all of the nutrients assessed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dietary intake in cats with cardiac disease was variable, but results for dietary supplement use, food use for medication administration, and treat feeding were different from those found in a similar study of dogs with cardiac disease. This information may be useful for treating and designing nutritional studies for cats with cardiac disease.



Source: Torin DS, Freeman LM, Rush JE. (2007): Dietary patterns of cats with cardiac disease. In: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2007 Mar 15;230(6):862-7.



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

RET-He to diagnose iron-deficient erythropoiesis in dogsmembers
Reticulocyte hemoglobin content provided by the Siemens ADVIA (CHr) is an established marker of iron deficiency. The IDEXX ProCyte Dx hematology analyzer now provides a similar variable, reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent (RET-He).
The objectives of this study were to evaluate RET-He and its diagnostic utility in dogs, and to calculate a cutoff value for diagnosing iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE).

  • Platelet indices in dogs with septic peritonitis
  • Hypertriglyceridemia-Associated Proteinuria in Miniature Schnauzersmembers
  • Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill animalsmembers
  • Disorder of sex development in a cat with chromosome mosaicism members
  • Generalized discoid lupus erythematosus in dogs members
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in dogsmembers
  • Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in American Brussels Griffon Dogsmembers
  • Efficacy and Potential Complications of Transjugular Liver Biopsymembers
  • Hypomagnesemia in Brachycephalic Dogsmembers
  • Comparison of two minimally invasive techniques for liver biopsy members
  • Topical aqueous sirolimus and the tear production members
  • JAK 1/2 inhibitor in the treatment of canine B-cell lymphomamembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved