Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
The clinical nutritionist`s experience to the management of obesity
Obese animals are common, just as obese owners are. Every veterinarians knows the sequela of adipositas - and every veterinarian knows that it can be extremely difficult to convince the owners that their pet is obese and needs to loose weight. The nutritionist´s standpoint is very interesting and may help to convince owners of overweight animals!

Overweight patients are common in veterinary medicine, just as they are in human medicine.

Although animals also suffer from diseases in the general categories of cancer, hypertension, diabetes, and digestive diseases, many of the specific problems of obese humans do not afflict obese pets.

Of tumors, only adenocarcinoma of the breast is a significant problem in dogs and cats.

Moreover, a high intake of dietary fat and table food has been reported to be protective in adult dogs; in women, increasing dietary fat has been associated with increased breast cancer risk.

Two experimental studies in dogs notwithstanding, no published data have been provided suggesting that hypertension accompanies obesity in companion animals currently.

Hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance has been reported in diabetic obese dogs as well as in humans.

Whether or not weight reduction would correct these abnormalities has not been reported. In humans, central distribution of fat may be more pathological than a peripheral distribution, increasing morbidity due to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension.

The presence of differences in fat distribution have not been described in companion animals, even though they may influence the risk of obesity-related diseases in pets as well. No studies of investigation of the success of maintenance of the lost weight in client animals exist.

Recently reported studies of obese women suggest that maintenance of lost weight may be better maintained with continuous care programs, and support the view that obesity should be treated like other chronic diseases, by providing ongoing care for the rest of the life of the patient.


Source: Buffington CA. (1994): Management of obesity - the clinical nutritionist`s experience. In: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Jun;18 Suppl 1:S29-35.





Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Brachycephalic airway syndrome - differences between pugs and French bulldogs
Does the brachycephalic airway syndrome mean the same in all brachycephalic breeds or are there breed-specific differences? A fascinating question was raised. This retrospective study including 72 dogs aimed to compare clinical features of brachycephalic airway syndrome and long-term surgical outcomes between pugs and French bulldogs and evaluate the influence of laryngeal collapse.

  • Prognostic factors in cats with HCMmembers
  • Ureteral Papilla Implantation in Cats Undergoing Renal Transplantationmembers
  • Storage lesion in canine packed erythrocytesmembers
  • Drug-induced infiltrative lung disease with cytarabine and prednisonemembers
  • Laparoscopic-assisted Gastropexy and the Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Dogsmembers
  • Transpalpebral ultrasonographic evaluation and measurement of the optic nerve members
  • Squamous cell carcinoma mimicking orbital myofibroblastic sarcomamembers
  • Unusual case of feline acute corneal hydropsmembers
  • Shock index in identifying acute blood loss in healthy dogsmembers
  • Correlation of direct in-house cerebrospinal fluid cytology with commercial pathology results members
  • 3 Serological Tests for Early Detection Of Leptospira-specific Antibodies members
  • Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved