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Embryonic stem cells in companion animals
Reproductive technologies have made impressive advances since the 1950s owing to the development of new and innovative technologies. Most of these advances were driven largely by commercial opportunities and the potential improvement of farm livestock production and human health. What about embryonic stem cells in companion animals? A very interesting update!

Companion animals live long and healthy lives and the greatest expense for pet owners are services related to veterinary care and healthcare products.

The recent development of embryonic stem cell and nuclear transfer technology in primates and mice has enabled the production of individual specific embryonic stem cell lines in a number of species for potential cell-replacement therapy.

Stem cell technology is a fast-developing area in companion animals because many of the diseases and musculoskeletal injuries of cats, dogs and horses are similar to those in humans.

Nuclear transfer-derived stem cells may also be selected and directed into differentiation pathways leading to the production of specific cell types, tissues and, eventually, even organs for research and transplantaton.

Furthermore, investigations into the treatment of inherited or acquired pathologies have been performed mainly in mice.

However, mouse models do not always faithfully represent the human disease. Naturally occurring diseases in companion animals can be more ideal as disease models of human genetic and acquired diseases and could help to define the potential therapeutic efficiency and safety of stem cell therapies.

In the present review, we focus on the economic implications of companion animals in society, as well as recent biotechnological progress that has been made in horse, dog and cat embryonic stem cell derivation.

Source: Tecirlioglu RT, Trounson AO. (2007): Embryonic stem cells in companion animals (horses, dogs and cats): present status and future prospects. In: Reprod Fertil Dev. 2007;19(6):740-7.




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EQUINE

Theiler´s disease in a Trakehner caused by contaminated tetanus vaccinemembers
An 11‐year‐old Trakehner gelding was presented for evaluation of lethargy, decreased appetite, mild icterus, and elevated hepatic enzyme activities. Physical examination, serum chemistry results, and liver biopsy histopathologic findings were supportive of Theiler`s disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing results of serum and liver tissue were positive for nonprimate (equine) hepacivirus (NPHV) and a novel equine parvovirus‐hepatitis virus (EqPV‐H). A serious and finally fatal problem, caused by contaminated vaccine.

  • Limbal squamous cell carcinoma in a Rocky Mountain Horse and geneticsmembers
  • Subconjunctival bupivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine and the corneal sensitivity in horsesmembers
  • Clodronate in horses with lamenessmembers
  • Valacyclovir in horses with equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosismembers
  • Radiculopathy associated with forelimb lameness in horsesmembers
  • Biological variations of routine blood parameters in horsesmembers
  • Prognosis for horses with deep digital flexor tendon injury after penetrating woundmembers
  • Possible maternal effect for the pace trait of horsesmembers
  • Flecainide on induced atrial fibrillation in horsesmembers
  • Sonographic technique to identify manica flexoria tears in horsesmembers
  • Novel prototype dynamic laryngoplasty system on arytenoid abductionmembers
  • Lipid peroxidation biomarkers in equine neuroaxonal dystrophymembers


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