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Calcified tumours of the paranasal sinuses in horses
Purulent nasal discharge as initial sign in horses - of course the differential diagnoses like Streptococcus equi and herpes virus infections come up immediately. But also a calcifying tumour of the paranasal sinuses can start with this symptoms, as this recently published case report from Australia illustrates!

Three horses, a 10-year-old Thoroughbred mare, a 9-year-old Thoroughbred gelding and a 6-year-old Arab gelding, with calcified tumours of the paranasal sinuses, are described.

All horses presented with purulent nasal discharges and facial distortion. Exophthalmos, blepharospasm and ocular discharge were also a feature in individual horses.

A presumptive diagnosis of a calcified tumour was made on the basis of clinical signs and radiographic and endoscopic findings.

The tumours ranged from 15 to 25 cm in diameter.

A large frontonasal bone flap was used to expose the tumours, which were cleaved into several pieces with an osteotome and removed.

Histological examination of the masses identified cementomas in two cases and an osteoma in the third.

Long term follow up from 18 months to 5 years after surgery indicated that there was no recurrence.

This case series demonstrates that, although calcified tumours of the paranasal sinuses are rare in horses, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of purulent nasal discharge, facial swelling and ocular distortion, and are amenable to surgical treatment.



Source: KL Schaaf, NJ Kannegieter, DK Lovell (2007): Calcified tumours of the paranasal sinuses in three horses. In: Australian Veterinary Journal 85 (11), 454–458.



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