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Uncommon location of a lipoma in an old dog
A 13 year-old Sibirean Husky is presented because of´porgressive hind limb paresis an urinary incontinence. A disc problem? Or just a cauda equina syndrome which is a common problem of old and especially male dogs and this breed. But further investigations show that this is not a routine case and that the correct diagnosis and treatment offers a better prognosis than previously thought!

Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in a 13-year-old, male Siberian husky that was referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and urinary incontinence.

An epidural mass was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

The mass was removed and identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma.

Pelvic limb paresis improved after surgery, but urinary retention associated with neurological bladder dysfunction persisted.


Source: Hiroshi Ueno, Tsuyoshi Miyake, Yoshiyasu Kobayashi, Kazutaka Yamada, Yuji Uzuka (2007): Epidural Spinal Myelolipoma in a Dog. In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 43:132-135 (2007)





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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

The expression of Vitamin D receptors in dogs
There is growing evidence linking low blood vitamin D concentration to numerous diseases in people and in dogs. Vitamin D influences cellular function by signaling through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Little is known about which non-skeletal tissues express the VDR or how inflammation influences its expression in the dog.
The objectives of this recently online published study were to define which non-skeletal canine tissues express the VDR and to investigate expression in inflamed small intestine.

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