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Update in treatment of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats
Bayer 1970.jpg Picture: © Bayer Animal Health
Dermatophytosis is a common problem especially in cats. Lots of controversial information concerning therapy have been published in the last couple years. Karen Moriello, one of THE experts in this field, gives a brandnew and critical review of the published studies and thus the current therapeutic options.

Based upon in vitro studies using isolated infected hairs and controlled or field in vivo studies, the following topical treatments were consistently found to be antifungal (i.e. antidermatophyte): lime sulfur (1:16), 0.2% enilconazole rinses, and a combined 2% miconazole/chlorhexidine shampoo. Animals or hairs were either bathed or rinsed once or twice weekly.

Itraconazole, griseofulvin and terbinafine were evaluated in controlled or field studies, most commonly involving cats.
Griseofulvin (50 mg kg1) was reported to cure infected animals in 41-70 days.
Itraconazole (10 mg kg1 once daily or in a combined daily/pulse therapy 10 mg kg1 once daily for 28 days and then week on/week off) was reported to cure infected animals in 56-70 days. Low-dose itraconazole (1.5-3.0 mg kg1) in 15-day cycles required 1-3 cycles (15-45 days).
Various doses of terbinafine (5-40 mg kg1) were reportedly used to treat dogs or cats. The higher doses of terbinafine (> 20 mg kg1) were required to achieve a mycological cure; the number of treatment days to cure varied from 21 to > 126 days.
Lufenuron was reported anecdotally to be an effective cure, however, this was not substantiated in controlled studies.

Finally, fungal vaccines were not found to be effective against challenge exposure, however, there is evidence that they may be useful in treatment protocols.


Source: Moriello, Karen A. (2004): Treatment of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats: review of published studies. In: Veterinary Dermatology 15 (2), 99-107.




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