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Mycotic endophthalmitis due to Candida albicans (case report)
Candida albicans is a yeast which is known to cause problems in humans and also in small mammals. Little is known about diseases in dogs due to this microorganisms. In this very interesting case report from a colleague from Hamburg a case of mycotic endophthalmitis is described, probably due to hematogenous infection.

The 3-year-old dog had a history of bloody diarrhea 3 months previously. The dog presented with acute signs of unilateral panuveitis.

Aqueocentesis, vitreocentesis, and routine blood tests were performed but did not contribute to the diagnosis. The posterior segment could not be visualized because of flare and fibrin.

On day 7 ultrasonography showed retinal separation which progressed to vitreous compartmentalization and abscessation by day 14.

Three weeks after onset, glaucoma developed and enucleation was performed. Histology revealed the yeast Candida to be the causative agent.

Post-enucleation serum Candida antibody titer was 1 : 640 (human threshold 1 : 120), as determined by agglutination test. A relapse of enteric signs 3 months later led to the diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic enteritis. An hematogenous route of infection is suspected.

To cite this article
Source: Linek, Jens (2004): Mycotic endophthalmitis in a dog caused by Candida albicans. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology 7 (3), 159-162.




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

3 Serological Tests for Early Detection Of Leptospira-specific Antibodies
Leptospirosis in dogs is a disease of global importance. Early detection and appropriate therapeutic intervention are necessary to resolve infection and prevent zoonotic transmission. However, its diagnosis is hindered by nonspecific clinical signs and lack of rapid diagnostic tests of early infection. Recently, 2 rapid point-of-care tests (WITNESS Lepto [WITNESS Lepto, Zoetis LLC, Kalamazoo, MI, USA] and SNAP Lepto [SNAP Lepto, IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, ME, USA]) for detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in canine sera were developed. This recently online published article compares three systems for early diagnosis.

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