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Reverse TPLO in a young dog
TPLO is a popular technique to treat rupture of the cranial cruciate Ligament in Dogs. But what is the indication for a reverse TPLO and how is this performed? A very interesting recently online published articlle describes a 4 · 5-month-old, 13 · 8 kg, female neutered mixed breed dog that was presented for evaluation of acute non-weight bearing right pelvic limb lameness and was treated with this technique.

Radiographs revealed a tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture for which open reduction/internal fixation was performed.

Asymmetrical premature closure of the cranial aspect of the proximal tibial physis ensued with a tibial plateau angle of −12°.

Abnormal stifle biomechanics resulted in lameness and caudal cruciate ligament fraying.

Tibial plateau -levelling osteotomy was performed in standard fashion with the exception that the proximal tibial -fragment was rotated cranioproximally to increase the tibial plateau angle from −12° to +5° (reverse tibial -plateau levelling osteotomy).

Normal healing and resolution of lameness followed and the dog remained -clinically healthy 2 years postoperatively.

This case report demonstrates that any change in proximal tibial anatomy, whether traumatic, iatrogenic or with therapeutic intent, can cause altered stifle biomechanics and should not be underestimated. Surgical management through corrective -osteotomy can be used to restore adequate function.

Source: Demianiuk, R. M. and Guiot, L. P. (2014), Reverse TPLO for asymmetrical -premature closure of the proximal tibial physis in a dog. Journal of Small Animal Practice. doi: 10.1111/jsap.12245



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
The objective of this pilot study was to describe the application and first preliminary data of a novel MRI and CT compatible patient-specific facemask for stereotactic brain biopsy of intracranial lesions in dogs. Five client-owned dogs presenting for neurological deficits consistent with forebrain disease were included in the study. All dogs had MRI findings consistent with an intracranial lesion. But biopsies in this region are not easy to obtain. Does an individual face mask help?

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