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Reverse TPLO in a young dog
TPLO is a popular technique to treat rupture of the cranial cruciate Ligament in Dogs. But what is the indication for a reverse TPLO and how is this performed? A very interesting recently online published articlle describes a 4‚ÄȬ∑‚ÄČ5-month-old, 13‚ÄȬ∑‚ÄČ8‚ÄČkg, female neutered mixed breed dog that was presented for evaluation of acute non-weight bearing right pelvic limb lameness and was treated with this technique.

Radiographs revealed a tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture for which open reduction/internal fixation was performed.

Asymmetrical premature closure of the cranial aspect of the proximal tibial physis ensued with a tibial plateau angle of ‚ąí12¬į.

Abnormal stifle biomechanics resulted in lameness and caudal cruciate ligament fraying.

Tibial plateau -levelling osteotomy was performed in standard fashion with the exception that the proximal tibial -fragment was‚ÄČrotated cranioproximally to increase the tibial plateau angle from ‚ąí12¬į to +5¬į (reverse tibial -plateau levelling osteotomy).

Normal healing and resolution of lameness followed and the dog remained -clinically healthy 2‚ÄČyears postoperatively.

This case report demonstrates that any change in proximal tibial anatomy, whether traumatic, iatrogenic or with therapeutic intent, can cause altered stifle biomechanics and should not be underestimated. Surgical management through corrective -osteotomy can be used to restore adequate function.

Source: Demianiuk, R. M. and Guiot, L. P. (2014), Reverse TPLO for asymmetrical -premature closure of the proximal tibial physis in a dog. Journal of Small Animal Practice. doi: 10.1111/jsap.12245



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Vocal fold granulomas in brachycephalic dogs
Vocal cord granulomas are rarely observed in brachycephalic breeds but often reported in humans as contact granulomas. Six French bulldogs were included in this retrospective descriptive study. Endoscopic laryngeal examinations were performed on all dogs under general anaesthesia. Vocal cord lesions were exclusively unilateral, exophytic, approximately 3‚Äźmm wide ulcerated mucosal nodules, arising from the vocal cord. Maybe an underdiagnosed disease in brachycephalic breeds?

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