Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Sonography to diagnose portosystemic shunts?
Portosystemic shunts sometimes occur in dogs and cats and their diagnosis can be difficult. During the last years, most of them were diagnosed by the combination of clinical signs, biochemistry and special X-rays. Could sonography be a quicker but reliable diagnostic method?

The value of ultrasonography was evaluated in 85 dogs and 17 cats presented with a clinically suspected portosystemic shunt (PSS).

A PSS was confirmed in 50 dogs and nine cats (single congenital extrahepatic in 42, single congenital intrahepatic in 11, and multiple acquired in six). Six dogs and one cat had hepatic microvascular dysplasia, and 29 dogs and seven cats had a normal portal system.

Ultrasonography was 92% sensitive, 98% specific, and had positive and negative predictive values of 98% and 89%, respectively, in identifying PSS, with an overall accuracy of 95%.

When a PSS was identified with ultrasonography, extrahepatic, intrahepatic, and multiple acquired PSS could be correctly differentiated in 53/54 patients (98%).
The combination of a small liver, large kidneys, and uroliths had positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 51% for the presence of a congenital PSS in dogs. The portal vein/aorta (PV/Ao) and portal vein/caudal vena cava (PV/CVC) ratios were smaller in animals with extrahepatic PSSs compared with animals with microvascular dysplasia, intrahepatic PSSs and those without portal venous anomalies (P<0.001).

All dogs and cats with a PV/Ao ratio of 0.65 had an extrahepatic PSS or idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension.
Dogs and cats with PV/Ao and PV/CVC ratios of 0.8 and 0.75, respectively, did not have an extrahepatic PSS.
Reduced or reversed portal flow was seen in four of four patients with multiple acquired PSSs secondary to portal hypertension.

The presence of turbulence in the caudal vena cava of dogs had positive and negative predictive values of 91% and 84%, respectively, for the presence of any PSS terminating into that vein.


Source: d`Anjou, Marc-André, Penninck, Dominique, Cornejo, Lilian & Pibarot, Philippe (2004)
ULTRASONOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF PORTOSYSTEMIC SHUNTING IN DOGS AND CATS. In: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound 45 (5), 424-437.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Determining the origin of hepatic masses in dogs by CTmembers
Can CT scans diagnose the anatomical origin of hepatic masses? A very interesting question! The objective of this study was to identify CT features of canine hepatic masses that could be used to determine their divisional or lobar origin.

  • Palliative-intent hypofractionated radiotherapy for non-resectable canine thyroid carcinoma
  • High field magnetic resonance imaging to describe soft tissues in the equine stifle
  • Retrobulbar cellulitis and abscessation in dogsmembers
  • Antimicrobial resistance and resistance risk factors in staphylococci isolated from catsmembers
  • Neurological signs after attenuation of single congenital portosystemic shuntsmembers
  • Vocal fold granulomas in brachycephalic dogsmembers
  • Unusual cause of megaoesophagus in three catsmembers
  • First description of a Limy bile syndrome in a dogmembers
  • Novel intratumoral therapy in canine transmissible venereal tumourmembers
  • Long-term outcome of dogs with primary immune-mediated thrombocytopeniamembers
  • Insulin treatment and IGF-I in cats with diabetes mellitusmembers
  • Color doppler ultrasound in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine testicles members


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ] [ Privacy Policy ]

    Copyright © 2001-2018 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved