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Who knows Porphyromonas gulae, salivosa and denticani?
Up to 80 percent of the dogs develop peridontal diseases sometimes in their live, and these three kinds of bacteria are often involved in the disease process and often also damage internal organs. A new study gives also other very interesting insights in an old problem that probably requires new treatment strategies!

The Pfizer Animal Health study revealed one or more of the three most prevalent bacteria known to cause canine periodontal disease were found in 74 percent of dogs.

Porphyromonas gulae, Porphyromonas salivosa and Porphyromonas denticani bacteria have been linked to diseases of the heart, kidney and lungs.

Several members of the genus Bacteroides were reclassified as members of the newly named Porphyromonas genus because scientists discovered the bacteria had a distinctive DNA sequence.

Their prevalence has prompted Pfizer to plan a study to monitor long-term effects of the three bacteria on bone loss related to periodontal disease. Pfizer researchers are hopeful their research will lead to new ways to prevent periodontal disease in dogs.

`Many dog owners don`t check their dog`s teeth and gums until they notice bad breath or their veterinarian identifies periodontal disease,` says Dr. David Haworth, manager, Veterinary Medicine Research & Development, Biologicals Clinical Development, Pfizer Animal Health. `Yet, maintaining healthy teeth is critical to keeping a dog healthy. We have finally been able to identify the three most common bacterial causes of canine oral health problems. That is a strong step toward helping veterinarians combat the problem.`


Source: DVM Newsmagazine Jan 1, 2005 ; www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

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