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Clindamycin once daily in canine pyoderma
The treatment of canine pyoderma with `staphylococcal-effective` antibiotics can become very expensive, especially if large dogs need to be treated over weeks. Is clindamycin given only once daily an effective therapeutic option? Might be!

Twenty-one dogs with canine superficial bacterial pyoderma were treated with clindamycin at a dosage of approximately 11 mg/kg body weight, q 24 hours, given orally for 14 to 42 days.

All dogs were reexamined on days 14, 28, and, if necessary, 42 and given a clinical score of excellent (i.e., complete remission), good (i.e., primary lesions resolved but secondary lesions evident), fair (i.e., partial improvement but primary lesions still evident), or poor (i.e., no improvement or worsening of the lesions).

A clinical score of excellent was obtained in 71.4% (15/21) of the dogs in this study within 14 to 28 days.


Source: PB Bloom and EJ Rosser (2001): Efficacy of once-daily clindamycin hydrochloride in the treatment of superficial bacterial pyoderma in dogs. In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, Vol 37, Issue 6, 537-542



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

The expression of Vitamin D receptors in dogs
There is growing evidence linking low blood vitamin D concentration to numerous diseases in people and in dogs. Vitamin D influences cellular function by signaling through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Little is known about which non-skeletal tissues express the VDR or how inflammation influences its expression in the dog.
The objectives of this recently online published study were to define which non-skeletal canine tissues express the VDR and to investigate expression in inflamed small intestine.

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