Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Only every fifth dog had known tick exposure
This is one of the interesting results of this large retrospective study about infections with Rickettsia rickettsii, known as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Also the very pleomorph clinical signs are described. Good news: the survival rate in this study was 100 percent!

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) was diagnosed in 30 dogs examined at North Carolina State University, Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 1984 and 1997.

Historical, physical examination, and laboratory abnormalities were reviewed.

Diagnostic criteria included a four-fold rise in antibody titer to Rickettsia rickettsii (R. rickettsii) (n=15) or a single R. rickettsii antibody titer of 1:1,024 or greater (n=15; when this initial titer was determined one week or more after the onset of clinical signs).

Fifteen (50%) dogs were greater than seven years of age, and 13 (43%) dogs were between two and seven years of age.

There was no sex predilection.

Only five (17%) dogs had a history of known tick exposure.

Presumably due to delayed diagnosis, dogs with antibody titers of 1:1,024 or greater at the time of presentation had a higher incidence of more severe neurological dysfunction (e.g., ataxia, hyperesthesia, vestibular disease, and seizures) and cutaneous lesions (e.g., hyperemia, edema, petechiae, ecchymoses, and necrosis).

Laboratory findings included anemia, leukocytosis accompanied by toxic granulation of neutrophils, hypoalbuminemia, and coagulation abnormalities; signs were generally more severe in the 15 dogs with R. rickettsii antibody titers of 1:1,024 or greater at the time of presentation.

Twelve (40%) dogs in this study were severely thrombocytopenic (less than 75 x10(3) platelets/microl; reference range, 200 to 450 x 10(3)/microl), without clinical evidence of fulminant disseminated intravascular coagulation.

In this study, the survival rate following R. rickettsii infection was 100%.


Source: AM Gasser, AJ Birkenheuer, and EB Breitschwerdt (2001): Canine Rocky Mountain Spotted fever: a retrospective study of 30 cases. In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, Vol 37, Issue 1, 41-48


Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
The objective of this pilot study was to describe the application and first preliminary data of a novel MRI and CT compatible patient-specific facemask for stereotactic brain biopsy of intracranial lesions in dogs. Five client-owned dogs presenting for neurological deficits consistent with forebrain disease were included in the study. All dogs had MRI findings consistent with an intracranial lesion. But biopsies in this region are not easy to obtain. Does an individual face mask help?

  • RET-He to diagnose iron-deficient erythropoiesis in dogsmembers
  • Hypertriglyceridemia-Associated Proteinuria in Miniature Schnauzersmembers
  • Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill animalsmembers
  • Disorder of sex development in a cat with chromosome mosaicism members
  • Generalized discoid lupus erythematosus in dogs members
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in dogsmembers
  • Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in American Brussels Griffon Dogsmembers
  • Efficacy and Potential Complications of Transjugular Liver Biopsymembers
  • Hypomagnesemia in Brachycephalic Dogsmembers
  • Comparison of two minimally invasive techniques for liver biopsy members
  • Topical aqueous sirolimus and the tear production members
  • JAK 1/2 inhibitor in the treatment of canine B-cell lymphomamembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved