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Percutaneous drainage of prostatic abscesses - quick and effective
Prostatic abscesses are sometimes diagnosed in dogs, especially in middle-aged or older animals. There are various techniques described, e.g. marsupialisation. This study from Italy shows an interesting therapeutic alternative: percutaneous ultrasound guided drainage is quick, less invasive and shows low postoperative complication rates!

Prostatic abscesses are an uncommon finding in the dog; they are most frequently seen in dogs over six years old, often in association with benign hyperplasia. Ultrasonography (US) is an essential technique to study prostatic conditions in the dog, because the particular anatomical site of this gland in the dog makes rectal palpation insufficient to assess even macroscopic changes.

Presently, US-guided drainage makes a particularly efficient tool for treatment of this condition in these patients. We report on our personal technique of percutaneous drainage of prostatic abscesses in the dog.

Forty-five dogs of different breeds and age were examined. Some of them were given short anesthesia or mild sedation for restraining purposes, although this procedure is painless and could be performed under local anesthesia like in human patients.

In man, the approach is perineal, but in the dog it is best to use an abdominal approach with right or left inguinal positions.

US is necessary for correct drainage of the abscess and for monitoring throughout the procedure.

US-guided percutaneous drainage of prostatic abscesses in the dog proved to be a safe and quick tool providing excellent results. No patients exhibited any postoperative complication and we had as little as 10% relapses at 30 days.

The following drainage with alcoholization of the abscessual cavity resolved the conditions definitively. This technique was particularly interesting for both its success rate and the lack of postoperative complications, which are usually quite common after conventional surgery.

Source: Bussadori C, Bigliardi E, D`Agnolo G, Borgarelli M, Santilli RA. (1999): The percutaneous drainage of prostatic abscesses in the dog. In: Radiol Med (Torino). 1999 Nov;98(5):391-4.



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