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Do eczema drugs increase the risk of cancer?
Tacrolimus (Protopic) and Pimecrolimus (Elidel) have become popular drugs to treat atopic eczema in humans, especially in children, and they are more and more used in certain skin disorders like DLE and atopic dermatitis in animals. Do they increase the risk to develop cancer like lymphomas? The FDA gave an official press release yesterday...

FDA Issues Public Health Advisory Informing Health Care Providers of Safety Concerns Associated with the Use of Two Eczema Drugs, Elidel and Protopic

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today advised health care professionals to prescribe Elidel (pimecrolimus) and Protopic (tacrolimus) only as directed and only after other eczema treatments have failed to work because of a potential cancer risk associated with their use. In addition, FDA is adding a black box warning to the health professional label for the two products and developing a Medication Guide for patients.

Today’s actions follow the recommendations made by the FDA’s Pediatric Advisory Committee during its February 15, 2005 meeting. At this meeting, findings of cancer in three different animal species were reviewed. The data showed that the risk of cancer increased as the amount of the drug given increased. The data also included a small number of reports of cancers in children and adults treated with Elidel or Protopic.

The manufacturers of the products have agreed to conduct research to determine whether there is an actual risk of cancer in humans, and, if so, its extent. Both products are applied to the skin to control eczema by suppressing the immune system. FDA’s Public Health Advisory specifically advises physicians to weigh the risks and benefits of these drugs in adults and children and consider the following:

Elidel and Protopic are approved for short-term and intermittent treatment of atopic dermatitis (eczema) in patients unresponsive to, or intolerant of other treatments.

Elidel and Protopic are not approved for use in children younger than 2 years old. The long-term effect of Elidel and Protopic on the developing immune system in infants and children is not known. In clinical trials, infants and children younger than 2 years of age treated with Elidel had a higher rate of upper respiratory infections than those treated with placebo cream.

Elidel and Protopic should be used only for short periods of time, not continuously. The long term safety of these products is unknown.


Children and adults with a weakened or compromised immune system should not use Elidel or Protopic.


Use the minimum amount of Elidel and Protopic needed to control the patient’s symptoms. The animal data suggest that the risk of cancer increases with increased exposure to Elidel or Protopic.
Protopic was approved in 2000 and Elidel in 2001 to treat eczema.



Source: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ANSWERS/2005/ANS01343.html


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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Reference intervals for blood parameters in Shetland Sheepdogsmembers
Several breeds have physiological peculiarities that induce variations in reference intervals (RIs) compared with the general canine population. Shetland sheepdogs (SSs) are reported to be more predisposed to different diseases (eg, hyperlipidemia, gallbladder mucocele, and hypothyroidism). Consequently, a breed‐specific approach is more often required. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether the RIs of the general canine population could be applied to that of SSs, and to generate breed‐specific RIs, where appropriate.

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