Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
  Interferon  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Postoperative results of vulvoplasty in dogs
A juvenile or recessed vulva can lead to numerous problems, most common recurrent urinary tract infections, perivulvar dermatitis and urinary incontinence. Therapy of choice is surgical vulvoplasty - but do the results really satisfy the owners?

The results of vulvoplasty were evaluated in 34 dogs that underwent surgery at the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between 1987 and 1999.

Case records were evaluated, and clients were interviewed by telephone.

The most common clinical signs of a juvenile or recessed vulva at initial examination were perivulvar dermatitis in 59% (20/34) of dogs and urinary incontinence and chronic urinary tract infection (UTI), each present in 56% (19/34) of dogs.

Other common complaints included pollakiuria, irritation, and vaginitis. Most dogs developed clinical signs before 1 year of age.

All dogs except one bichon frise were medium to giant breeds, suggesting that vulvar conformation may be related to growth rate or body conformation; prior ovariohysterectomy did not appear to be an influencing factor.

Eighty-two percent of owners rated the outcome of the surgery as at least satisfactory.
The incidence of urinary incontinence was reduced by vulvoplasty; however, it remained the most common residual sign after surgery, suggesting a multifactorial etiology.
The incidences of UTI, vaginitis, and external irritation were greatly reduced after surgery.


Source: Scott P. Hammel, Dale E. Bjorling (2002): Results of Vulvoplasty for Treatment of Recessed Vulva in Dogs. In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 38:79-83 (2002)


Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

SRY-negative 78,XX testicular disorder in a young bitch
An eight-month-old female dog presented with ambiguous external genitalia. A thorough clinical examination together with various imaging techniques and a histology examination showed the presence of two testicles linked to both the Mullerian and Wolffian ducts. To the authors´ knowledge, this is the first case that describes an SRY-negative 78,XX testicular disorder of sex development with bilateral scrotal testicles.



  • New surgical technique for feline distal tibial fractures members
  • 5-FU pulse-therapy in canine corneal squamous cell carcinoma members
  • Plasma D-dimer concentration and coagulopathies in horses with colicmembers
  • Third eyelid excision with a CO2 lasermembers
  • Isolation and culture of canine uveal melanocytesmembers
  • Oclacitinib versus prednisolone in dogs with allergic dermatitismembers
  • Three ultrasound guided approaches to the lumbar plexus members
  • Effects of the combination of butorphanol, midazolam and alfaxalone in Beagles members
  • Closed suction drainage in dogs with septic peritonitismembers
  • Equine glaucoma - histopathologic findingsmembers
  • Laparoscopic versus open cystopexy in dogsmembers
  • Sliding humeral osteotomy (SHO) in dogs - long term effectsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2013 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved