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Do dogs with gastric dilatation benefit from metoclopramide therapy?
Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a disorder characterized by delayed gastric emptying. Is metoclopramide, a putative gastroprokinetic agent, a `must have` for dogs that had recovered from GDV? An interesting an very important question in every day-practice!

6 healthy dogs and 5 dogs after treatment and recovery from GDV were included in this study.

Baseline recordings of gastric electrical and contractile activities were made 8 or 10 days after circumcostal gastropexy and implantation of serosal electrodes and strain-gauge force transducers.

Gastric activities were recorded again the next day after treatment with the clinically recommended oral metoclopramide dose (0.3 mg/kg of body weight) administered a half hour before feeding.

Recordings were analyzed to determine gastric slow-wave frequency, presence of slow-wave dysrhythmia, slow-wave propagation velocity, coupling of contractions to slow waves, a motility index based on relative contractile amplitudes, and onset of contractions after a standardized meal.

RESULTS: Significant differences in gastric electrical or contractile activities were not detected after metoclopramide treatment in dogs with GDV. Compared with control dogs after metoclopramide treatment, gastric slow-wave propagation velocity was significantly (P = 0.03) faster for the dogs with GDV at postprandial minute 90.

CONCLUSION: At a clinically recommended dosage, metoclopramide treatment did not change gastric myoelectric and motor activities in a way that would promote increased gastric emptying in dogs with GDV.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Metoclopramide treatment may not benefit dogs with GDV and delayed gastric emptying.

Source: Hall JA, Solie TN, Seim HB 3rd, Twedt DC (1996): Effect of metoclopramide on fed-state gastric myoelectric and motor activity in dogs. In: Am J Vet Res. 1996 Nov;57(11):1616-22



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Radioactive iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats after rh-TSHmembers
Radioactive iodine therapy is considered the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism in cats, but the availability of this modality is limited by costs and hospitalization requirements. Administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh‐TSH) to humans with thyroid neoplasia or nodular goiter can increase thyroidal iodine uptake, thereby allowing the use of lower radioactive iodine doses for treatment. Veterinary studies of this subject are limited, and results are conflicting. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rh‐TSH administration on thyroidal iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats.

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