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Terbinafine versus ketoconazole in canine malassezia dermatitis
Azoles and especially ketoconazole have become the drugs of choice in the therapy of malassezia dermatitis in dogs. Terbinafine is a antimycotic drug which is well tolerated and safe and has been used very successful in canine dermatophytosis. Is it also a good option to treat yeasts?

The purpose of this randomized, single blinded clinical trial was to evaluate cytologically and clinically the efficacy of oral cephalexin alone and its combination with terbinafine or ketoconazole for the treatment of Malassezia dermatitis in dogs.

Twenty-two client-owned dogs with Malassezia dermatitis completed the 3-week study. All received cephalexin (generic, 250 mg or 500 mg) at 2230 mg kg1 twice daily.

Eight dogs received terbinafine at 30 mg kg1 once daily and seven dogs received ketoconazole (generic, 200 mg) at 510 mg kg1 twice daily.

The remaining seven dogs received cephalexin alone.

At week 0 (visit 1) and week 3 (visit 2), mean yeast counts were determined from three affected areas using tape-strip cytology, a clinical index score (CIS) was assigned to the affected areas, and owners evaluated pruritus using a visual analogue scale.

All groups showed reduction in mean yeast counts, CIS and pruritus.

There was an 86.8%, 80.2% and 28.8% reduction in mean yeast counts from visit 1 to visit 2 for the terbinafine, ketoconazole and cephalexin-only groups, respectively.

However, within treatment group comparisons a significant reduction in mean yeast count was only evident for the terbinafine (P < 0.002) and ketoconazole (P < 0.01) groups.

Pruritus reduction was only significant for the terbinafine group.

These preliminary results suggest that terbinafine should be further assessed for the treatment of canine Malassezia dermatitis.




Source: ROSALES, MILLIE S., MARSELLA, ROSANNA, KUNKLE, GAIL, HARRIS, BRADLEY L., NICKLIN, CONSTANCE F. & LOPEZ, JENNIFER (2005): Comparison of the clinical efficacy of oral terbinafine and ketoconazole combined with cephalexin in the treatment of Malassezia dermatitis in dogs a pilot study. In: Veterinary Dermatology 16 (3), 171-176.




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