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Laser application in canine corneal diseases
The use of different lasers has become very popular in human medicine of the last decade. Often the owners ask for this technique if neoplasias especially in the face or on the eyelids have to be removed. This article compares three different lasers which can be used on the canine cornea and gives recommendations for the best indications of each. Very informative!

The clinical use of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and diode laser is increasing in veterinary medicine.

New applications for their use are being explored, including ophthalmic applications.

The use of lasers for small-animal corneal disease is fairly limited due to several factors.

The ideal laser for corneal use is the excimer laser due to its extremely precise photoablative capability. However, the excimer laser is unlikely ever to become practical for veterinary use.
The frequency of corneal disease in small animals in which tissue ablation is indicated is relatively low. And for most of these diseases, routine surgical techniques work as well or better than laser ablation.

The CO2 laser can be used on corneal tissue, but must be used very cautiously so as not to ablate too deeply, creating serious scarring or perforation. There are also concerns regarding its effect on corneal nerves, stromal collagen, and corneal endothelium.
The CO2 laser can be very effective in ablating limbal tumors with corneal extension.

The use of the laser is less invasive, technically less difficult, and faster because of excellent hemostasis.

The diode laser, due to its high melanin absorption, can be used effectively to ablate epibulbar melanomas with corneal stromal invasion.

Source: Gilmour MA. (2003): Laser applications for corneal disease. In: Clin Tech Small Anim Pract. 2003 Aug;18(3):199-202.


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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Sonography vs percutaneous palpation to identify targeted thoracolumbar intervertebral disc spacesmembers
During minimally invasive spinal surgery, correct identification of the affected intervertebral disc space is critical. Percutaneous palpation is commonly used, but results may be unreliable. Fluoroscopy is the gold standard but can be cumbersome and exposes operators to ionizing radiation. Spinal ultrasound has been described in veterinary medicine and could be a feasible alternative. This prospective, methods comparison study mimicked a minimally invasive spinal surgery in 10 canine cadavers and compared the accuracy of ultrasound and percutaneous palpation for thoracolumbar intervertebral disc space identification, using fluoroscopy as the reference standard.

  • Distribution of alveolar-interstitial syndrome in dogs and cats with respiratory distress members
  • Lymph node FNAC for the staging of malignant solid tumors
  • Unexpected signs in a young dog with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia
  • Disorders of sex development in catsmembers
  • Core ocular surface microbiome in dogsmembers
  • ACVIM small animal consensus statement on safe use of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics members
  • MRI imaging of masticatory muscles in basset houndsmembers
  • Mucosal microbiota, gastrointestinal inflammation and small cell intestinal lymphoma in cats members
  • Efficacy of pentamidine analogue 6 in dogs with chronic atrial fibrillationmembers
  • Tick-borne relapsing fever in various speciesmembers
  • Canine hyperadrenocorticism associations with signalment, selected comorbidities and mortality members
  • Intracameral injection of epinephrine and 2% lidocaine in the eyes of healthy catsmembers


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