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Laser application in canine corneal diseases
The use of different lasers has become very popular in human medicine of the last decade. Often the owners ask for this technique if neoplasias especially in the face or on the eyelids have to be removed. This article compares three different lasers which can be used on the canine cornea and gives recommendations for the best indications of each. Very informative!

The clinical use of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and diode laser is increasing in veterinary medicine.

New applications for their use are being explored, including ophthalmic applications.

The use of lasers for small-animal corneal disease is fairly limited due to several factors.

The ideal laser for corneal use is the excimer laser due to its extremely precise photoablative capability. However, the excimer laser is unlikely ever to become practical for veterinary use.
The frequency of corneal disease in small animals in which tissue ablation is indicated is relatively low. And for most of these diseases, routine surgical techniques work as well or better than laser ablation.

The CO2 laser can be used on corneal tissue, but must be used very cautiously so as not to ablate too deeply, creating serious scarring or perforation. There are also concerns regarding its effect on corneal nerves, stromal collagen, and corneal endothelium.
The CO2 laser can be very effective in ablating limbal tumors with corneal extension.

The use of the laser is less invasive, technically less difficult, and faster because of excellent hemostasis.

The diode laser, due to its high melanin absorption, can be used effectively to ablate epibulbar melanomas with corneal stromal invasion.

Source: Gilmour MA. (2003): Laser applications for corneal disease. In: Clin Tech Small Anim Pract. 2003 Aug;18(3):199-202.


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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Radioactive iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats after rh-TSHmembers
Radioactive iodine therapy is considered the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism in cats, but the availability of this modality is limited by costs and hospitalization requirements. Administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh‐TSH) to humans with thyroid neoplasia or nodular goiter can increase thyroidal iodine uptake, thereby allowing the use of lower radioactive iodine doses for treatment. Veterinary studies of this subject are limited, and results are conflicting. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rh‐TSH administration on thyroidal iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats.

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