Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Trigeminus neuropathy in the dog
Trigeminus neuropathy is commonly seen in men due to a variety of reasons. One of the most common is a herpes virus infection. But what about dogs? How common is a neuropathy of this very important nerve and what about the reasons in this species? A very fascinating study!

The medical records of 29 dogs unable to close their mouths due to flaccid paralysis or paresis of the muscles innervated by the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, were reviewed.

Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy was diagnosed in 26 dogs based on complete resolution of clinical signs and lack of any long-term neurological disease.

Of these dogs, golden retrievers were over-represented.
No age, sex, or seasonal predispositions were identified.

Trigeminal sensory innervation deficits were observed in 35% (9/26), facial nerve deficits were observed in 8% (2/26), and HornerÂ’s syndrome was observed in 8% (2/26) of dogs.

Electromyographic examination of the muscles of mastication revealed abnormalities in seven of nine dogs. Results of cerebrospinal fluid analysis were abnormal in seven of eight dogs. Corticosteroid therapy did not affect the clinical course of the disease.

Mean time to recovery was 22 days.

Lymphosarcoma, Neospora caninum infection, and severe polyneuritis of unknown origin were diagnosed in three of 29 dogs at necropsy.



Source: Philipp D. Mayhew, William W. Bush, Eric N. Glass (2002): Trigeminal Neuropathy in Dogs: A Retrospective Study of 29 Cases (1991–2000). In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 38:262-270 (2002)




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Correlation of direct in-house cerebrospinal fluid cytology with commercial pathology results
In-house diagnostics are commonly used in veterinary practices, often allowing a quick diagnosis and thus the start of an adequate therapy. The aim of this online published new study was to investigate the correspondence between in-house direct cytological assessment of cerebrospinal fluid and results from a commercial veterinary pathology laboratory.

  • Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
  • Critically ill dogs and their immune function
  • RET-He to diagnose iron-deficient erythropoiesis in dogsmembers
  • Hypertriglyceridemia-Associated Proteinuria in Miniature Schnauzersmembers
  • Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill animalsmembers
  • Disorder of sex development in a cat with chromosome mosaicism members
  • Generalized discoid lupus erythematosus in dogs members
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in dogsmembers
  • Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in American Brussels Griffon Dogsmembers
  • Efficacy and Potential Complications of Transjugular Liver Biopsymembers
  • Hypomagnesemia in Brachycephalic Dogsmembers
  • Comparison of two minimally invasive techniques for liver biopsy members


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved