Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Temperature gradients within mammalian ovaries before ovulation
The existence of a temperature gradient between the testis and deep body temperature has been accepted for many years. But what about the ovaries? Is there a similar mechanism? Very interesting findings from Scandinavia which are `hot off the press`.

The temeprature gradient in males is based on two simultaneous principles: cooling of the testis through the scrotal wall and transfer of heat between the testicular blood vessels.

The ovary is positioned in the abdomen; a temperature difference parallel to the male system therefore seems less likely.

However, the temperature of large follicles has been found to be 0.5 to 1.5 °C cooler than the ovarian stroma in rabbits, pigs and, probably, women.

The temperature difference seems to be based on a heat-consuming process in the expanding follicullar fluid, and a local transfer of heat between intra-ovarian blood vessels.

The reason for the temperature gradient is not yet known; one may speculate of a common reason for the cooling of the gamete in male and female.




Source: Hunter, R. H. F. & Einer-Jensen, N. (2005): Pre-ovulatory temperature gradients within mammalian ovaries: a review. In: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 89 (7-8), 240-243.





Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Acute echocardiographic effects of sotalol in dogs with ventricular arrhythmias
Sotalol is a commonly used antiarrhythmic drug that may alter ventricular function. The objective of this recently published study was to determine the effect of sotalol on echocardiographic indices of ventricular systolic function in dogs with ventricular arrhythmias.
Thirty‐five client‐owned dogs with ventricular arrhythmias were enrolled.

  • Proteasome inhibitors for canine and human osteosarcomamembers
  • Pharmacokinetics of a novel mirtazapine transdermal ointment in catsmembers
  • Bacterial contamination in 50% dextrose vials after multiple puncturesmembers
  • Sotalol and the ventricular systolic function in dogs with ventricular arrhythmiasmembers
  • Life-threatening arterial haemorrhage during nephrectomymembers
  • Update to the chinchilla retinamembers
  • Vocal fold granulomas in brachycephalic dogsmembers
  • Extracellular vesicles in mammary cancer of dogs and catsmembers
  • Immunocytochemical assay using aqueous humor to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis members
  • Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury members
  • False-positive CT and radiography results for bronchial collapse in healthy dogsmembers
  • Variability of SDMA in apparently healthy dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ] [ Privacy Policy ]

    Copyright © 2001-2018 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved