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Temperature gradients within mammalian ovaries before ovulation
The existence of a temperature gradient between the testis and deep body temperature has been accepted for many years. But what about the ovaries? Is there a similar mechanism? Very interesting findings from Scandinavia which are `hot off the press`.

The temeprature gradient in males is based on two simultaneous principles: cooling of the testis through the scrotal wall and transfer of heat between the testicular blood vessels.

The ovary is positioned in the abdomen; a temperature difference parallel to the male system therefore seems less likely.

However, the temperature of large follicles has been found to be 0.5 to 1.5 °C cooler than the ovarian stroma in rabbits, pigs and, probably, women.

The temperature difference seems to be based on a heat-consuming process in the expanding follicullar fluid, and a local transfer of heat between intra-ovarian blood vessels.

The reason for the temperature gradient is not yet known; one may speculate of a common reason for the cooling of the gamete in male and female.




Source: Hunter, R. H. F. & Einer-Jensen, N. (2005): Pre-ovulatory temperature gradients within mammalian ovaries: a review. In: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 89 (7-8), 240-243.





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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Reference intervals for blood parameters in Shetland Sheepdogsmembers
Several breeds have physiological peculiarities that induce variations in reference intervals (RIs) compared with the general canine population. Shetland sheepdogs (SSs) are reported to be more predisposed to different diseases (eg, hyperlipidemia, gallbladder mucocele, and hypothyroidism). Consequently, a breed‐specific approach is more often required. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether the RIs of the general canine population could be applied to that of SSs, and to generate breed‐specific RIs, where appropriate.

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