Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Neurologic toxoplasmosis - an important differential diagnosis
Neurological signs are a common reason for animals being presented in the emergency unit. Many causes like metabolic to cardiologic disorders are possible. But do you also always consider a neurologic toxoplasmosis as a differential? You should, as this case series shows, and start a therapy with TMS or clindamycin!

Signalment, clinical signs, abnormal laboratory data, therapeutics, and response to therapy of dogs with clinical signs consistent with toxoplasmosis infection were reviewed.

A retrospective review was performed on the records of 4 dogs presented to the Animal Emergency Center between January 1998 and February 2000 exhibiting neurologic signs and having elevated titers for Toxoplasma gondii.

A tentative diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was based upon one of the following criteria: (1) a serial 4-fold or greater change in serum T. gondii IgG titers; 2) serially decreasing serum T. gondii IgM titers with concurrent increasing serum T. gondii IgG titers; or 3) positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T. gondii titers.

In addition, inclusion of cases was limited to dogs that showed improvement of neurologic signs following treatment with antiprotozoal drugs.

Trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole treatment was associated with successful elimination of clinical signs in all of the dogs.

Two of the dogs developed side effects potentially attributed to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole (TMS), and antiprotozoal treatment was continued using clindamycin.

Toxoplasmosis is an important differential diagnosis in any dog that presents as an emergency with central or peripheral neurologic signs. Affected dogs need not be immunocompromised for clinical signs of toxoplasmosis to occur. Appropriate treatment with TMS or clindamycin can lead to resolution of clinical signs.


Source: Tarlow, Jeremy M., Rudloff, Elke, Lichtenberger, Marla & Kirby, Rebecca (2005): Emergency presentations of 4 dogs with suspected neurologic toxoplasmosis. In: Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care 15 (2), 119-127.





Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Punica granatum associated with hepatotoxicosis in cattlemembers
The ingestion of pomegranates was associated with the deaths of 9 of 35 young cattle; 8 were found dead without any prior clinical signs being noted and 1 animal was observed to be weak with pale‐pink mucous membranes. This case report describes also gross pathological and histopathological signs of the affected cattle and discusses the question which toxic principle was underlying in this case.

  • Toceranib phosphate (Palladia®) in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumorsmembers
  • Radioactive iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats after rh-TSHmembers
  • Hypoechoic tissue changes in dogs with malignant prostatic lymphomamembers
  • Emphysematous gastritis in dogs and catsmembers
  • Primary pulmonary histiocytic sarcoma in dogsmembers
  • Determining prognosis in canine sepsis members
  • Correlation of plasma and tear glucose, creatinine and urea nitrogen in catsmembers
  • Perineal hernias in dogs - always a bilateral problem?members
  • Pharmacokinetic of gabapentin in catsmembers
  • Follicular development of canine ovaries stimulated by eCG plus hCGmembers
  • Gastrointestinal effects following acupuncture in healthy dogsmembers
  • Bilateral repair of apparently unilateral perineal hernias in dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ] [ Privacy Policy ]

    Copyright © 2001-2018 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved