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Susceptibility of Porcine Embryos to Classical Swine Fever Virus
A very interesting question: Is there a difference in suspectibility of embryos to classic swine fever virus, if they are either in vitro or in vivo produced? It seems so, as this brandnew German study shows. Still further in vivo tests are necessary to confirm these results.

The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of in vivo- and in vitro-produced (IVP) porcine embryos to classical swine fever virus (CSFV).

IVP zona pellucida (ZP)-intact porcine embryos (n = 721) were co-cultured with CSFV for 120 h. After washing according to the International Embryo Transfer Society guidelines (without trypsin) and transferring embryos to CSFV-susceptible porcine kidney cells (PK15 cell line), no virus was isolated.

However, when 88 IVP ZP-intact porcine embryos were co-cultured with CSFV for only 48 h before being transferred to PK15 cells, virus was isolated in three of six replicates.

Similarly, 603 in vivo-produced porcine embryos were co-cultured with CSFV for 120 h.

Subsequently, CSFV was isolated in eight of 50 groups (16%) and the ability of these to form a blastocyst was significantly reduced when compared with the control group (68.2 ± 19.9% vs 81.9 ± 9.7%; p 0.001). I

n contrast, the development of CSFV-exposed IVP porcine embryos was not affected when compared with control embryos (19.1 ± 10.8% vs 18.9 ± 10.6%; p 0.05).

After removal of the ZP of IVP embryos and subsequent co-culture with CSFV, the virus was isolated from all groups of embryos.

These data suggest that virus replication had occurred in the embryonic cells.

In conclusion, data indicate that in vivo- and in vitro-produced ZP-intact porcine embryos differ in their susceptibility to CSFV.

Hatched or micro-manipulated embryos may increase the risk of transmission of CSFV by embryo transfer, which has to be confirmed by in vivo tests under isolation conditions.


Source: Schüürmann, E, Flögel-Niesmann, G, Mönnig, V & Rath, D (2005): Susceptibility of In Vivo- and In Vitro-produced Porcine Embryos to Classical Swine Fever Virus. In: Reproduction in Domestic Animals 40 (5), 415-421.





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