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Lasers in canine corneal diseases
The use of different laser types has become a standard in the therapy of numerous eye diseases in men. In dogs, this procedure is less common. Which important points need to be considered in this species, and which laser is the best? A very interesting summary.

The clinical use of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and diode laser is increasing in veterinary medicine.

New applications for their use are being explored, including ophthalmic applications. The use of lasers for small-animal corneal disease is fairly limited due to several factors.

The ideal laser for corneal use is the excimer laser due to its extremely precise photoablative capability.
However, the excimer laser is unlikely ever to become practical for veterinary use.

The frequency of corneal disease in small animals in which tissue ablation is indicated is relatively low.
And for most of these diseases, routine surgical techniques work as well or better than laser ablation.

The CO2 laser can be used on corneal tissue, but must be used very cautiously so as not to ablate too deeply, creating serious scarring or perforation.

There are also concerns regarding its effect on corneal nerves, stromal collagen, and corneal endothelium.

The CO2 laser can be very effective in ablating limbal tumors with corneal extension. The use of the laser is less invasive, technically less difficult, and faster because of excellent hemostasis.

The diode laser, due to its high melanin absorption, can be used effectively to ablate epibulbar melanomas with corneal stromal invasion.


Source: Gilmour MA. (2003): Laser applications for corneal disease. In: Clin Tech Small Anim Pract. 2003 Aug;18(3):199-202.




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
The objective of this pilot study was to describe the application and first preliminary data of a novel MRI and CT compatible patient-specific facemask for stereotactic brain biopsy of intracranial lesions in dogs. Five client-owned dogs presenting for neurological deficits consistent with forebrain disease were included in the study. All dogs had MRI findings consistent with an intracranial lesion. But biopsies in this region are not easy to obtain. Does an individual face mask help?

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