Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Cyproheptadine in cats
Cyproheptadine is sometmes used in cats to stimulate their appetite. What about the distribution in the body after oral or intravenous application? The results of this study give interesting informations...

The objective of this study including 6 healthy cats was to determine disposition of cyproheptadine hydrochloride in cats after intravenous or oral administration of a single dose. A randomized crossover design was used, and each cat was studied after intravenous (2 mg) and oral (8 mg) administration of cyproheptadine.

Blood samples were collected at fixed time intervals after drug administration, and serum cyproheptadine concentration was determined by means of polarized immunofluorescence.

RESULTS: Mean (+/- SD) residence time was significantly longer after oral (823 +/- 191 minutes) than after intravenous (339 +/- 217 minutes) administration, but no significant differences were detected between other pharmacokinetic parameters after oral and intravenous administration.

Mean +/- SD oral bioavailability was 1.01 +/- 0.36.

Mean elimination half-life after oral administration was 12.8 +/- 9.9 hours. Peak extrapolated cyproheptadine concentration was 669 +/- 206 ng/ml. Only 1 cat developed adverse effects (transient vocalization).

CONCLUSIONS: Cyproheptadine appeared to be well tolerated in cats and had high bioavailability after oral administration. The mean elimination half-life of 12 hours indicated that approximately 2.5 days must elapse to achieve steady-state concentrations of cyproheptadine after oral administration of multiple doses. A 12-hour dosing interval is acceptable, but an 8-hour interval may be indicated for some cats.

On the basis of pharmacokinetic parameters determined in this study, the oral form of cyproheptadine appears to be suitable for use in clinical trials to treat anorexia in cats. Its half-life is compatible with once or twice daily dosing.


Source: Norris CR, Boothe DM, Esparza T, Gray C, Ragsdale M. (1998): Disposition of cyproheptadine in cats after intravenous or oral administration of a single dose. In: Am J Vet Res. 1998 Jan;59(1):79-81.



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Tolerability of a rapid-escalation vinblastine-prednisolone protocol in canine mast cell tumours
Optimal chemotherapy protocols for high-risk mast cell tumours (MCTs) are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the tolerability and toxicity profile of a rapidly escalating vinblastine and prednisolone protocol (VPP) in which 3.00 mg/m2 was administered once 7 days apart: at day 14 and at day 21.

  • Translaryngeal percutaneous arytenoid lateralization technique in dogsmembers
  • Hypothermia in Dogs and Cats with Uremia
  • Retrospective Study of Feline Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
  • 2-tier histologic grading system for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors on cytology members
  • Dynamic sonography of the metacarpophalangeal digital flexor tendon sheath in horsesmembers
  • Improved survival in patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for sarcomamembers
  • LDE tendon mineralization with concurrent cruciate ligament rupturemembers
  • Role of IL-4 in neoplastic canine mast cellsmembers
  • Cryopreserved platelet concentrate transfusions in 43 dogsmembers
  • CT comparison of intranasal features in brachycephalic and normocephalic dogsmembers
  • Comparison of 2 Doses for ACTH Stimulation Testing in Dogs members
  • NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin I in dogs with tick paralysis due to I. holocyclusmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved