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Fibromyalgia in horses: an unknown disease
Fibromyalgia in men is an important but often misdiagnosed disease. The same is true for horses: many veterinarians do not even know that this disease exists. In this excellent summary, clinical signs are listed.

Equine fibromyalgia syndrome (EFMS) is one of the big diagnostic challenges.

According to the American College of Rheumatology, up to 6 million Americans suffer from fibromyalgia syndrome, yet there are no diagnostic tests to confirm its existence. In humans, symptoms can include muscle aches, painful tendons and ligaments, gastrointestinal discomfort, headaches, sleep disturbances and fatigue.

Theories about the cause or causes range from trauma to an infectious agent to central nervous system injury to alterations in muscle metabolism.

Symptoms
EFMS horses might exhibit autoimmune problems, micro-circulatory deficits, cranial nerve problems, endocrine imbalances, generalized chronic fatigue or a combination of these conditions. An important fact is that an individual horse or human can have two or three symptoms or as many as 20.

While most aspects of human fibromyalgia syndrome and EFMS are identical, the equine athlete will demonstrate more extreme symptoms when an already compromised immune system is stressed during work. Interestingly, in both human and equine syndromes, a fungal component exists either as a sequela or as a cause of the disease.

Autoimmune problems run the gamut from immune-mediated arthritis to toxicity to immune-mediated neuritis.

Often, previously injured joints will be most significantly affected, although the horse may exhibit signs of overall body soreness. Any transient lameness that shifts from fore legs to hind legs or from side to side should be suspect.

Immune-mediated neuritis can manifest itself as stringhalt or shivers or both (analogous to human restless leg syndrome.) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be a component of the autoimmune response, often accompanied by parotid salivary gland enlargement (swollen glands), an occasional mucous nasal discharge, a non-productive cough, or a combination of these symptoms. The owner may report seasonal respiratory allergies that come and go.

Deficits in micro-circulation can lead to a multitude of problems, such as muscle deconditioning, hoof problems and skin infections. The racehorse with advanced EFMS and compromised alveolar function might exhibit exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Those individuals already hypersensitive to molds and fungi are prime candidates for developing asthma and COPD. Smooth muscle deconditioning can cause irritable bowel syndrome, leaky bowel syndrome, and their obvious sequelae (colitis and colic).

The most common cardiac muscle deficiency in humans is mitral valve prolapse; horses will sometimes develop a loud diastolic murmur with or without left ventricular enlargement. Hoof problems to consider are white line disease, chronic abscesses, petechial redness in white hoof walls, cracked insensitive laminae, and extreme sensitivity to hard ground. Poor tissue oxygenation and outward signs of toxicity go hand in hand: abnormal fat deposits at the base of the tail, a potbellied appearance, a dull greasy hair coat, and chronic fungal skin infections.

Many symptoms involving the cranial nerves get evaluated out of context and, hence, are never effectively treated. Hypersensitivity to touch (for example, bridles, insects, grooming tools, shampoos, fly sprays) can result in chronic head shyness. Add to this a hypersensitivity to non-contact stimuli (sound, light), and the stage is set for creating a head-shaker.

Any suggestion of facial neuritis should be a significant red flag. Horses have the unique ability to use cribbing as a mechanism for endorphin release and the resulting myofacial pain relief.
Evidence of anterior pituitary involvement is abundant.
Examples are extremely high or low estrogen, progesterone, or testosterone levels; excessive sweating; anhidrosis, adrenal exhaustion syndrome; chronic fatigue; and loss of equilibrium.

Stumbling, falling down, difficulty picking up or switching leads at the canter, tentative gaits over uneven or sloping ground, or difficulty standing still for the blacksmith are common complaints. The owner might notice the horse struggling to walk up or down the horse trailer ramp.

Source: Brenda Bishop (2003): Fibromyalgia cases trickling into practice. In: DVM Newsmagazine Oct 1, 2003; www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/


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EQUINE

Theiler´s disease in a Trakehner caused by contaminated tetanus vaccinemembers
An 11‐year‐old Trakehner gelding was presented for evaluation of lethargy, decreased appetite, mild icterus, and elevated hepatic enzyme activities. Physical examination, serum chemistry results, and liver biopsy histopathologic findings were supportive of Theiler`s disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing results of serum and liver tissue were positive for nonprimate (equine) hepacivirus (NPHV) and a novel equine parvovirus‐hepatitis virus (EqPV‐H). A serious and finally fatal problem, caused by contaminated vaccine.

  • Limbal squamous cell carcinoma in a Rocky Mountain Horse and geneticsmembers
  • Subconjunctival bupivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine and the corneal sensitivity in horsesmembers
  • Clodronate in horses with lamenessmembers
  • Valacyclovir in horses with equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosismembers
  • Radiculopathy associated with forelimb lameness in horsesmembers
  • Biological variations of routine blood parameters in horsesmembers
  • Prognosis for horses with deep digital flexor tendon injury after penetrating woundmembers
  • Possible maternal effect for the pace trait of horsesmembers
  • Flecainide on induced atrial fibrillation in horsesmembers
  • Sonographic technique to identify manica flexoria tears in horsesmembers
  • Novel prototype dynamic laryngoplasty system on arytenoid abductionmembers
  • Lipid peroxidation biomarkers in equine neuroaxonal dystrophymembers


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