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New chemotherapy protocol for canine lymphoma
Different protocols exist to treat lymphomas in dogs, almost all of them base on a remission protocol followed by a maintenance protocol. This study compares a maintenance-free chemotherapy protocol based on CHOP (H from hydroxydaunorubicin = doxorubicin, O from Oncovin = vincristine) to a similar protocol with a maintenance phase for the treatment of canine lymphoma.

Fifty-three dogs with multicentric lymphoma were treated with a 6-month modified version of the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison chemotherapy protocol (UW-25). Disease-free interval (DFI) and survival were compared to a historical control group of 55 dogs treated with a similar protocol with a prolonged maintenance phase. Remission rate for the study dogs was 94.2% (complete remission = 92.3%, partial remission = 1.9%). DFI and survival between the 2 groups did not differ significantly, with median DFI and survival of the study dogs equal to 282 and 397 days compared to 220 and 303 days for the control dogs (P = .2835 and .3365, respectively). Univariate analysis identified substage b (P = .0087), German Shepherd breed (P = .0199), and body weight > 18 kg (P = .0016) as significant for worse survival. Longer survival was associated with thrombocytopenia (P = .0436). Multivariate analysis revealed that substage (P = .0388) and weight (P = .0125) retained significance for DFI, whereas substage (P = .0093), thrombocytopenia (P = .0150), and weight (P = 0 .0050) retained significance for survival. Overall, the protocol was well tolerated by the dogs, with 41.5% (22/53) requiring a treatment delay or dose modification, but only 9.4% (5/53) needing hospitalization. The 6-month chemotherapy protocol based on CHOP with no maintenance phase provides similar DFI and survival times when compared to a similar protocol with a prolonged maintenance phase.


Source: Garrett LD, Thamm DH, Chun R, Dudley R, Vail DM (2002): Evaluation of a 6-month chemotherapy protocol with no maintenance therapy for dogs with lymphoma. In: J Vet Intern Med 2002 Nov-Dec;16(6):704-9






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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Pyothorax in dogs and cats - a review
Pyothorax, also known as thoracic empyema, is characterized by the accumulation of septic purulent fluid within the pleural space. While the actual route of pleural infection often remains unknown, the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract appear to be the most common source of microorganisms causing pyothorax in dogs and cats. In human medicine, pyothorax is a common clinical entity associated with bacterial pneumonia and progressive parapneumonic effusion. This excellent update reviews the current literature in reference to the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pyothorax in dogs and cats.

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