Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
  Interferon  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Laryngeal paralysis in cats
Laryngeal paralysis is a well-known problem in certain dog breeds, espcially in animals with hypothyroidism. But the problem also occurs in cats, and the disease seems to be more common than previously thought. A very interesting summary of 16 cases!

This retrospective study was performed to determine clinical signs, physical examination findings, radiographic features, and concurrent diseases in cats with laryngeal paralysis, as well as evaluate the outcome of medical or surgical management. 16 cats with laryngeal paralysis were included, presented between January 1990 and April 1999.

Signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, cervical and thoracic radiographic findings, laryngeal examination results, and clinical outcome were reviewed.

RESULTS: No breed or sex predilection was identified in 16 cats with laryngeal paralysis. The most common clinical signs included tachypnea or dyspnea, dysphagia, weight loss, change in vocalization, coughing, and lethargy.

Clinical signs were evident for a median of 245 days. Airway obstruction was apparent on cervical and thoracic radiographic views in 9 cats.

Examination of the larynx revealed bilateral laryngeal paralysis in 12 cats and unilateral laryngeal paralysis in 4 cats.

The 4 cats with unilateral disease were managed with medical treatment, and 3 of these had acceptable long-term outcomes.

Seven of 12 cats with bilateral paralysis underwent surgery; procedures performed included left arytenoid tie back, bilateral arytenoid tie back and ventriculo-cordectomy, and partial left arytenoidectomy. One cat was euthanatized as a result of complications from surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Laryngeal paralysis is an uncommon cause of airway obstruction in cats. Cats with less severe clinical signs (often with unilateral paralysis) may be successfully managed with medical treatment, whereas cats with severe airway obstruction (often with bilateral paralysis) may benefit from surgical intervention.


Source: Schachter S, Norris CR. (2000): Laryngeal paralysis in cats: 16 cases (1990-1999). In:
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000 Apr 1;216(7):1100-3.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Correlation of murmur intensity and disease severity in small dogs
Myxomatous mitral valve disease is a common Problem especially in small and older dogs. This new study was performed to determine whether murmur intensity in small-breed dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease reflects clinical and echocardiographic disease severity.

  • Silicone tracheal stoma stents for temporary tracheostomy
  • D- and L-lactate in the blood of healthy rabbits
  • Surgical biopsy of the canine and feline pancreas - complications and results
  • Novel technique for cementless total hip replacement in juvenile dogs
  • COGS in the dogmembers
  • Blood glucose in small animals with acute arterial thrombembolismmembers
  • Different techniques of conjunctival flap repair for corneal defects members
  • Canine uveal melanocytes - isolation and culturemembers
  • Troponin I and T as prognostic markers in feline HCMmembers
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) in dogs with naturally acquired bacterial keratitismembers
  • Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in a non-Spaniel breedmembers
  • Maropitant versus acepromazine in hydromorphone premedicated dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2013 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved