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Selamectin against Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Dermacentor variabilis
Every spring dog owners ask for tick prevention because they want to protect their pet from the various tick-borne diseases. Which product do you recommend, and which product can be recommended? This article looks at the efficacy of selamectin against certain tick infestations in a number of studies.

Seven controlled studies were conducted to investigate the efficacy of selamectin against weekly infestations of dogs with Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Dermacentor variabilis.

Treatments (selamectin or vehicle alone) were applied topically at weekly, 2-week, or monthly intervals or in a `Monthly Plus` regimen (monthly treatment with an additional treatment at 14 days after the first treatment).

Selamectin was supplied in unit dose tubes designed to deliver a minimum dosage of 6mgkg(-1). The studies ranged in duration from 37 to 90 days.

Fifty adult ticks (+/-2) were applied approximately weekly, and tick counts were performed 3, 4, and 5 days after each infestation.

The efficacy of selamectin was expressed as the percentage reduction in geometric mean tick counts on selamectin-treated dogs compared with those for dogs treated with the vehicle alone (negative-control).

In one study, the engorgement of Dermacentor variabilis was assessed by weighing ticks after removal on the fifth day after each infestation. Weekly and 2-week interval treatments with selamectin provided efficacies against R. sanguineus of >89% across the entire study periods, with 100% efficacy being achieved from 21 days after the first dose and thereafter (study duration, 37 days for the weekly regimen and 44 days for the 2-week interval regimen). D. variabilis also was well controlled by the 2-week interval treatment regimen, with >96% efficacy being achieved from 21 days after the first treatment and thereafter until the end of the study (study duration: 90 days).

In five of six studies incorporating three treatments at monthly intervals, the percentage reduction in R. sanguineus and D. variabilis counts 5 days after infestation ranged from 90 to 100% in the second and third months after treatment began.

In the sixth study, reductions of > or =95% in D. variabilis counts 5 days after infestation were achieved for 2 weeks after each treatment in the second and third months. For the Monthly Plus regimen, from the second treatment (day 14) onwards, selamectin achieved 83-100% reductions in R. sanguineus and D. variabilis counts 3 days after infestation, and 94-100% reductions 5 days after infestation in three of the four studies.

In the fourth study, selamectin demonstrated good efficacy against D. variabilis for 2 weeks after each treatment.

In all seven studies, the counts from the selamectin-treated dogs were significantly (P< or =0.018) lower than those from the vehicle-treated dogs on 77 of the 80 assessments made 5 days after infestation.

Selamectin also significantly (P< or =0.0105) reduced engorgement of female D. variabilis. These studies demonstrated that selamectin, administered topically to the skin in a single spot at a minimum dosage of 6mgkg(-1) at monthly intervals, was effective in the control of experimentally induced R. sanguineus and D. variabilis infestations on dogs.


Source: Jernigan AD, McTier TL, Chieffo C, Thomas CA, Krautmann MJ, Hair JA, Young DR, Wang C, Rowan TG.(2000): Efficacy of selamectin against experimentally induced tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Dermacentor variabilis) infestations on dogs. In: Vet Parasitol. 2000 Aug 23;91(3-4):359-75.




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Brachycephalic airway syndrome - differences between pugs and French bulldogs
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