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Pustular calicivirus dermatitis on the abdomen of two cats after routine ovariectomy
Calicivirus infections in cats are well-known to every small animal practitioner. Normally they affect the upper respiratory tract. But these two cats showed a very unusual manifestation of a calicivirus-induced dermatitis: the abdomen, after routine ovariectomy. An extremely interesting case report from Belgium!

Two fully vaccinated cats were re-admitted for anorexia and depression following routine ovariectomy. Signs of upper respiratory disease were not present.

One cat subsequently showed painful necrosis of the incision wound, the other one developed dyspnoea with pleural effusion and discrete tongue ulcers.

Intact pustular lesions confined to the surgically prepared abdomen appeared in both cats, respectively, on days 11 and 9.

The histopathological diagnosis was panepidermal pustulosis and necrotizing dermatitis.

Positive immunohistochemical staining consistent with feline calicivirus antigen was detected in epithelial cells within pustular lesions.

The cats were treated with antibiotics and ketoprofen.

The cat with progressive dyspnoea was euthanized. The clinical signs in the other cat rapidly and completely resolved following glucocorticoid therapy.

It is hypothesized that the reported cases may represent a distinct calicivirus-induced pustular dermatitis following ovariectomy.


Source: DECLERCQ, J. (2005): Pustular calicivirus dermatitis on the abdomen of two cats following routine ovariectomy. In: Veterinary Dermatology 16 (6), 395-400.





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EQUINE

Head computed tomography in equine practicemembers
Computed tomography (CT) has become popular also in the diagnosis of equine patients, including lesions of the head. This retrospective study describes the findings in 59 horses presented with diseases of the head over 8 years that underwent CT examination of this region, including dental or sinonasal diseases (Group A) (n = 42), osseous and/or articular diseases (Group B) (n = 11) and soft tissue diseases (Group C) (n = 6). A very useful new study!

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