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Laparoscopic Obliteration of the Nephrosplenic Space in Horses
The nephrosplenic space in horses is one of the areas which can be affected by severe and life-threatening colics. Is it possible to obliterate the area via laparascopy as a prevention? An interesting descriptive experimental study from the USA.

Five healthy mature horses were included in this study.

One laparoscope and 2 instrument portals were made on the left side of the horse.
The nephrosplenic space was measured and appropriately sized polypropylene mesh was inserted and attached to the dorsolateral splenic capsule and perirenal fascia using helical titanium coils.

All horses had repeat laparoscopy 4 weeks later and were necropsied at intervals 4–14 weeks after mesh placement.

Results: Mean time for laparoscopic mesh placement was 104 minutes.
None of the horses had signs of colic and at 4 weeks all mesh implants were covered by fibrous tissue.
One horse had a descending colon mesenteric adhesion to the mesh.

At necropsy, the fibrous tissue covering the mesh had adhered to itself and pulled the splenic capsule and perirenal fascia into close apposition. Each mesh implant was firmly adhered to the spleen, nephrosplenic ligament, and perirenal fascia.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic mesh placement was easily performed, well tolerated, and provided excellent fibrous obliteration of the nephrosplenic space.

The single important complication observed was a mesenteric adhesion of the descending colon to the mesh in 1 horse.

Laparoscopic placement of polypropylene mesh leads to obliteration of the nephrosplenic space within 4 weeks and should prevent entrapment of viscera in the nephrosplenic space.


Source: EPSTEIN, KIRA L. & PARENTE, ERIC J. (2006): Laparoscopic Obliteration of the Nephrosplenic Space Using Polypropylene Mesh in Five Horses. In: Veterinary Surgery 35 (5), 431-437.




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