Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Equine /     
 
Regional differences in the drug penetration through equine skin
A very interesting new study showing that at least hydrocortisone penetrates the equine skin differently, depending from the location - if the same is proven in in vivo studies this new insights may change topical therapies...

Little is known about the transdermal penetration of hydrocortisone in the horse and, although commercial formulations containing hydrocortisone are registered for topical use in the horse, there have been no studies investigating the movement of this glucocorticoid through different regions of equine skin.

Skin was harvested from the thorax, groin and leg (dorsal metacarpal) regions of five Thoroughbred geldings and frozen (−20 °C) until required.

Defrosted skin was placed in Franz-type diffusion cells and the amount of radiolabelled (3H) hydrocortisone, in a saturated solution of unlabelled hydrocortisone in 50% ethanol (w/w), which penetrated through and remained within skin samples was measured over 24 h.

Significantly higher (P < 0.001) maximum flux (Jmax; mol/cm2/h) was measured when hydrocortisone was applied to skin from the leg, compared to thorax and groin, although significantly less hydrocortisone (P < 0.001) was retained within skin from the leg at 24 h.

Topical application of hydrocortisone in a vehicle containing ethanol would penetrate faster through leg skin from the lower leg when compared with the thorax or groin, which depending on cutaneous blood flow, may result in higher systemic drug concentrations or greater efficiency in treating local inflamed tissue.


Source: MILLS, P. C. & CROSS, S. E. (2006): Regional differences in the in vitro penetration of hydrocortisone through equine skin. In: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 29 (1), 25-30.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

EQUINE

Head computed tomography in equine practicemembers
Computed tomography (CT) has become popular also in the diagnosis of equine patients, including lesions of the head. This retrospective study describes the findings in 59 horses presented with diseases of the head over 8 years that underwent CT examination of this region, including dental or sinonasal diseases (Group A) (n = 42), osseous and/or articular diseases (Group B) (n = 11) and soft tissue diseases (Group C) (n = 6). A very useful new study!

  • Primary stabilisation for tail avulsion in cats
  • Traumatic coccygeal luxation and distal amputation of the tail of a horse
  • Standing intraoral extractions of cheek teeth in horsesmembers
  • Actinobacillus capsulatus peritonitis and chyloabdomen in a horsemembers
  • Adverse effect of an intrapleural tissue plasminogen activatormembers
  • Avulsion of the proximal digital annular ligament in five horsesmembers
  • Penile and preputial squamous cell carcinoma in the horse members
  • CT diagnosis of fatigue fracture of Mt 3 in young adult horsesmembers
  • Two regimens of lidocaine infusion in horses undergoing laparotomy for colicmembers
  • Biofilms of Candida spp. from the ocular conjunctiva of horses members
  • PARR clonality testing in a horse with a solitary retropharyngeal lymphomamembers
  • New sensor design for buccal pulse oximetry in horsesmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved