Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
First versus third generation of pulse oximeters
Pulse oximetry is a standard procedure to control anesthetized animals. Currently the third generation of oximeters entered the market. Are the newer the better, and how much better are they? An interesting prospective study with surprising results!

This prospective laboratory investigation was done to compare the accuracy of a 3rd (Dolphin Voyager) versus 1st generation pulse oximeter (Nellcor N-180). Eight adult dogs were included.

In anesthetized dogs, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was recorded simultaneously with each pulse oximeter.

The oxygen fraction in inspired gas (FiO2) was successively reduced from 1.00 to 0.09, with re-saturation (FiO2 0.40) after each breathe-down step.

After each 3-minute FiO2 plateau, SpO2 and pulse rate (PR) were compared with the fractional arterial saturation (SaO2) and PR determined by co-oximetry and invasive blood pressure monitoring, respectively.

Data analysis included Bland-Altman (B¨CA) plots, Lin`s concordance correlation factor (¦Ñc), and linear regression models.

Results: Over a SaO2 range of 33¨C99%, the overall bias (mean SpO2 − SaO2), precision (SD of bias), and accuracy (Arms) for the Dolphin Voyager and Nellcor N-180 were 4.3%, 4.4%, and 6.1%, and 3.2%, 3.0%, and 4.3%, respectively.

Bias increased at SaO2 < 90%, more so with the Dolphin Voyager (from 1.6% to 8.6%) than Nellcor N-180 (from 3.2% to 4.5%).

The SpO2 readings correlated significantly with SaO2 for both the Dolphin Voyager (¦Ñc = 0.94) and Nellcor N-180 (¦Ñc = 0.97) (p < 0.001).

Regarding PR, bias, precision, and accuracy (Arms) for the Dolphin Voyager and Nellcor N-180 were −0.5, 4.6, and 4.6 and 1.38, 4.3, and 4.5 beats minute1, respectively. Significant correlation existed between pulse oximeter and directly measured PR (Dolphin Voyager: ¦Ñc = 0.98; Nellcor N-180: ¦Ñc = 0.99) (p < 0.001).

Conclusions and clinical relevance: In anesthetized dogs with adequate hemodynamic function, both instruments record SaO2 relatively accurately over a wide range of normal saturation values. However, there is an increasing overestimation at SaO2 < 90%, particularly with the Dolphin Voyager, indicating that 3rd generation pulse oximeters may not perform better than older instruments.

The 5.4-fold increase in bias with the Dolphin Voyager at SaO2 < 90% stresses the importance of a 93¨C94% SpO2 threshold to ensure an arterial saturation of ¡Ý90%.

In contrast, PR monitoring with both devices is very reliable.


Source: Burns, Patrick M, Driessen, Bernd, Boston, Ray & Gunther, Robert A (2006): Accuracy of a third (Dolphin Voyager) versus first generation pulse oximeter (Nellcor N-180) in predicting arterial oxygen saturation and pulse rate in the anesthetized dog. In: Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 33 (5), 281-295.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Fluorescein sodium-guided resection of intracranial lesions in dogs
Twenty-two dogs with intracranial lesions were enrolled in this prospective case series. The objectives were to evaluate the safety of an intraoperative fluorescein sodium (FS) injection and elucidate the relationships between the MRI findings, pathological diagnoses, and intraoperative staining characteristics of intracranial lesions in 22 dogs.

  • Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Sialocele in Dogs
  • Ultrasound and clinical findings in cats with urethral obstructionmembers
  • Complex atlanto-axial malformation in a rabbit
  • Novel technique to measure plasma lipids in diabetic dogsmembers
  • Prevalence and disease associations in feline thrombocytopeniamembers
  • Optic neuritis in dogs: an updatemembers
  • Brachycephalic airway syndrome - differences between pugs and French bulldogsmembers
  • Prognostic factors in cats with HCMmembers
  • Ureteral Papilla Implantation in Cats Undergoing Renal Transplantationmembers
  • Storage lesion in canine packed erythrocytesmembers
  • Drug-induced infiltrative lung disease with cytarabine and prednisonemembers
  • Laparoscopic-assisted Gastropexy and the Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved