Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Privacy Policy  
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Nocardia infections in cats in Australia
Nocardiosis is a rare but very serious disease which also occurs in cats. This excellent summary gives an update of nocardiosis and compares this case series of 17 cats with cases previously reported.

Nocardia spp infections were diagnosed in 17 cats over 14 years from the three eastern states of Australia.

There were no isolates from dogs during this period, but one isolate from a koala and two from dairy cows.

The majority of cats presented with spreading lesions of the subcutis and skin associated with draining sinus tract(s).

Early cutaneous lesions consisted of circumscribed abscesses.

Infections spread at a variable rate, generally by extension to adjacent tissues.

Lesions were generally located in regions subjected to cat bite or scratch injuries, including limbs, body wall, inguinal panniculus and nasal bridge.

In some other cases, lesions were situated on distal extremities.

The clinical course was variable, from chronic, indolent, initially localised infections to acute fulminating disease.

Of the 17 cats, 14 were domestic crossbreds and three were purebreds.

There was a preponderance of male cats (12 castrated, 1 entire young adult, 1 entire kitten).
Nine of 17 cats were 10 years or older. Interestingly, the majority of infections were attributable to N nova.

Immediate and/or predisposing causes could be identified in all cases, and included: renal transplantation [one cat]; chronic corticosteroid administration [three cats]; catabolic state following chylothorax surgery [one cat]; fight injuries [seven cats]; FIV infections [three of seven cats tested].

Of the 17 cats, three were apparently cured. Four were thought to be cured, but infection recurred after several months.

Three cats responded partially but were euthanased, while another was improving when it died of unrelated complications.

Two died despite treatment and two were euthanased without an attempt at therapy. For two cats there were either insufficient records or the patient was lost to follow up.

Conclusion Nocardiosis is a rare, serious disease. Currently it is more common in cats than dogs.

Nocardial panniculitis may be clinically indistinguishable from the syndrome caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria.

Although the prognosis is guarded, patients with localised infections caused by N nova often respond to appropriate therapy.

If definitive treatment is delayed because of misdiagnosis, the disease tends to become chronic, extensive and refractory. Insufficient duration of therapy leads to disease recurrence.



Source: MALIK, R, KROCKENBERGER, MB, O`BRIEN, CR, WHITE, JD, FOSTER, D, TISDALL, PLC, GUNEW, M, CARR, PD, BODELL, L, MCCOWAN, C, HOWE, J, OAKLEY, C, GRIFFIN, C, WIGNEY, DI, MARTIN, P, NORRIS, J, HUNT, G, MITCHELL, DH & GILPIN, C (2006): Nocardia infections in cats: a retrospective multi-institutional study of 17 cases. In: Australian Veterinary Journal 84 (7), 235-245.




Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Proteasome inhibitors for canine and human osteosarcomamembers
Osteosarcoma, a common malignancy in large dog breeds, typically metastasises from long bones to lungs and is usually fatal within 1 to 2 years of diagnosis. Better therapies are needed for canine patients and their human counterparts, a third of whom die within 5 years of diagnosis. The authors compared the in vitro sensitivity of canine osteosarcoma cells derived from 4 tumours to the currently used chemotherapy drugs doxorubicin and carboplatin, and 4 new anti‐cancer drugs.

  • Pharmacokinetics of a novel mirtazapine transdermal ointment in catsmembers
  • Bacterial contamination in 50% dextrose vials after multiple puncturesmembers
  • Sotalol and the ventricular systolic function in dogs with ventricular arrhythmiasmembers
  • Life-threatening arterial haemorrhage during nephrectomymembers
  • Update to the chinchilla retinamembers
  • Vocal fold granulomas in brachycephalic dogsmembers
  • Extracellular vesicles in mammary cancer of dogs and catsmembers
  • Immunocytochemical assay using aqueous humor to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis members
  • Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury members
  • False-positive CT and radiography results for bronchial collapse in healthy dogsmembers
  • Variability of SDMA in apparently healthy dogsmembers
  • Bioavailability of suppository acetaminophen in dogsmembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ] [ Privacy Policy ]

    Copyright © 2001-2018 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved