Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Articles /     
 
Listeria Contamination of Ready-to-Eat Food Products and Household Environments
Every year alarming numbers of Listeria in smoked salmon are published. But not only fish is commonly contaminated with this pathogen. A very interesting online published survey from Vienna gives 3 categories of contamination. A very informative work!

Qualitative and quantitative contamination of ready-to-eat food-stuffs with the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes was studied in 1586 samples collected from 103 supermarkets (n = 946) and 61 households (n = 640) in Vienna, Austria.

Seventeen groups of ready-to-eat foods were classified into three risk categories for contamination (CP1–CP3).

Three to four samples were randomly collected at the retail level from each CP.

Regarding the households, the sampling procedure was started with food items of CP1, and if not available, was continued with sampling of food items of CP2 and finally of CP3.

Additionally, 184 environmental samples (swabs from the kitchen area, dust samples from the vacuum cleaner) and faecal samples (household members and pet animals) were included.

One-hundred and twenty-four (13.1%) and 45 (4.8%) samples out of 946 food samples collected from food retailers tested positive for Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively, with five smoked fish samples exceeding the tolerated limit of 100 CFU/g food.

Food-stuffs associated with the highest risk of contamination were twice as frequently contaminated with L. monocytogenes as food-stuffs associated with a medium risk of contamination.

Products showing the highest contamination rate were fish and seafood (19.4%), followed by raw meat sausages (6.3%), soft cheese (5.5%) and cooked meat products/patés (4.5%).

The overall contamination rate of foods collected at the household level was more than two times lower.

Only 5.6% and 1.7% of 640 food-stuffs analysed tested positive for Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively.

However, CP1 foods were rarely collected.

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of the collected L. monocytogenes isolates revealed a high degree of diversity between the isolates, with some exceptions.

PFGE typing of isolates harvested from green-veined cheese revealed a match among strains, although the manufacturer seemed to be distinguishable.

Typing of household strains revealed an epidemiological link within one family.

In this case, food-stuffs and the kitchen environment were contaminated by an indistinguishable isolate.

In addition, the same isolate was collected from a pooled faecal sample of the household members suggesting that consumption of even low contaminated food items (<100 CFU/g) results in Listeria shedding after the passage through the gut.



Source: M. Wagner, B. Auer, C. Trittremmel, I. Hein, D. Schoder (2007): Survey on the Listeria Contamination of Ready-to-Eat Food Products and Household Environments in Vienna, Austria. In: Zoonoses and Public Health 54 (1), 16–22.



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

ARTICLES

Pharmacokinetics of quinocetone in ducks after two routes of administrationmembers
Quinocetone (QCT), an antimicrobial growth promoter, is widely used in food-producing animals. However, information about pharmacokinetics (PK) of QCT in ducks still remains unavailable up to now. In this study, QCT and its major metabolites (1-desoxyquinocetone, di-desoxyquinocetone and 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic) in ducks were studied using a simple and sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS assay.

  • Novel antibiotic treatment of zebrafish mycobacteriosismembers
  • Canine mammary tumours as model for hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humansmembers
  • Treatment of corneal ulceration in stranded California sea lions members
  • Effects of substrates and stress on placental metabolismmembers
  • Vaccine regimens against caecal Salmonella Typhimurium colonisation in laying hensmembers
  • Presumptive keratoglobus in a raptormembers
  • Monitored, controlled long-term anaesthesia in broiler chickenmembers
  • Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin in alpacasmembers
  • Use and effect of hand antiseptics in veterinary practicemembers
  • Two dogs with cold agglutinin activitymembers
  • Mechanical ventilation and blood gases and blood pressure in rattlesnakesmembers
  • Infectious haemolytic anemia in an orphaned juvenile female platypus members


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved