Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
  Interferon  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Articles /     
 
Swine veterinarians at risk of contracting swine hepatitis E-virus
Bayer 1418.jpg Picture © Bayer Animal Health
This is the result of a recently published study testing 468 swine veterinarians. Result: 23% of them were positive with swine HEV antigen. Tip: `Washing hands and practicing hygiene is the No. 1 preventive measure for this disease.`

`That`s not surprising because of their occupational exposure,` says Xiang-Jin Meng, M.D., Ph.D., who led a study in which scientists analyzed the risk to veterinarians of contracting swine HEV.

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (January 2002), assessed the potential risk of zoonotic HEV infection by testing 468 swine veterinarians (including 389 U.S. swine veterinarians who belonged to the American Association of Swine Practitioners). In addition 400 normal U.S. blood donors were tested for immunoglobulin G anti-HEV.

The veterinarians were tested from eight U.S. states (Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, and Alabama) from which normal blood donor samples were available.

`These states were chosen because states like Minnesota and Iowa are the major swine-producing states. We also included Alabama (which) is traditionally a non-swine producing state to see if there was a difference between a major swine state and non-swine state,` says Meng, who discovered the swine version of human hepatitis E in 1997.

At the time of discovery, Meng says, `We did not know whether the pig virus would cause any disease or even affect humans at that time. ` In the past five years, researchers confirmed the virus is zoonotic.

Testing blood samples

In the most recent study, Meng and team used recombinant capsid antigens from a U.S. strain of swine HEV and from a human HEV strain (Sar-55) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

The results: 26 percent of veterinarians were positive with Sar-55 antigen and 23 percent were positive with swine HEV antigen. In contrast, 18 percent of the blood donors from the eight states were positive with Sar-55 antigen and 17 percent were positive with swine HEV antigen.

In Minnesota, 44 percent of swine veterinarians tested positive for swine HEV; Iowa, 29 percent positive; while Alabama had only 13 percent.

Overall, scientists concluded that swine veterinarians in the eight states were 1.51 times more likely when tested with swine HEV antigen and 1.46 times more likely when tested with Sar-55 antigen to be anti-HEV positive than normal blood donors.

No difference was noted in anti-HEV prevalence between veterinarians who reported having had a needle stick or cut and those who had not or between those who spent more time and those who spent less time working with pigs.

Additionally, says Meng, `This disease is usually is age-dependent for swine and humans. The older you are, the more chance you get infected. However in this case, we found that age is not a factor in observed differences from state to state.`

The next step is to develop a first-ever vaccine, says Meng. The National Institutes of Health is supporting two grants for such a project. Meng envisions a vaccine based on the swine HEV virus to prevent human disease, `the so-called generic approach. We`ll try to use a pig virus to try to prevent a human hepatitis E virus.`

Advice

In the meantime, `The best precaution a veterinarian should take is to wash their hands thoroughly when they handle pigs. This is a fecal orally transmitted disease. If you touch pigs` feces-contaminated water or water supplies and you don`t wash the hands before drinking or eating, you probably can get infected,` he says.


Source: Stephanie Davis (April 1, 2002): DVMs more vulnerable to HEV-positive pigs. In: DVM Newsmagazine April 1, 2002. www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/










Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

ARTICLES

Two dogs with cold agglutinin activitymembers
The clinical signs of the two dogs in this case series were as different as their breeds, and the diagnosis of this rare disease was not easy. A very interesting case series from the USA.

  • Mechanical ventilation and blood gases and blood pressure in rattlesnakesmembers
  • Infectious haemolytic anemia in an orphaned juvenile female platypus members
  • Bilateral lens luxation in a tree kangaroomembers
  • Description of the lacrimal system of snakes members
  • Monoclonal Antibodies Against Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleoproteinmembers
  • PCR to detect mycobacteria in fixed samplesmembers
  • Use of chicken Newcastle disease vaccines in pigeonsmembers
  • Tembusu virus in China - an underdiagnosed zoonosis? members
  • Novel Assay for Rapid Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. in Ticksmembers
  • Human ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosismembers
  • Systemic toxoplasmosis in young captive flying-foxesmembers
  • Bat Rabies in Europemembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2013 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved