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Outbreak of Q-fever in the UK
Avon, Gloucestershire, and Wiltshire Health Protection unit has received 5 reports of acute Q fever with onset dates between the end of May and 14 Jun 2007. All 5 confirmed cases are residents of the town of Cheltenham (Gloucestershire).

Q fever (caused by Coxiella burnetti) is thought to account for approximately one percent of community acquired pneumonia in the UK
each year and can result in serious complications such as endocarditis.

The main reservoir is sheep and other animals that can shed massive numbers in placental tissues. The main reservoirs are sheep, goats and cattle.

Transmission of Q fever occurs primarily
through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. The organism is robust and can survive in dust and animal litter for many weeks and in dried
blood for at least 6 months at room temperature.

The most infectious animal materials are the fluids of birth and afterbirth, followed by
blood, milk, urine and feces. Such infectious materials can be derived from livestock as above or from domestic animals, particularly parturient cats.

Source: www.promedmail.org


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BOVINE

Lifetime prognosis in cattle with necrotic laryngitismembers
Necrotic laryngitis, caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, frequently requires surgical intervention (laryngostomy) in the chronic stage. A total of 221 cattle diagnosed with necrotic laryngitis by laryngoscopy and surgically treated were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. The objective of this study: To determine survival until slaughter of cattle surgically treated for necrotic laryngitis and to identify predictors of mortality.

  • ECG findings in neonatal calves with diarrhea and associated potassium balance disordersmembers
  • Bacterial translocation in calves with atresia colimembers
  • Optimising lameness detection in dairy cattle members
  • Role of melatonin and its receptors in animal reproductionmembers
  • Physiological changes in inflammatory parameters in cows prae and post partummembers
  • Zinc Deficiency-Like Syndrome in Fleckvieh Calvesmembers
  • Fertility of dairy cows after adding superphosphate to the drinking watermembers
  • Activity of continous releasing oxfendazole capsules against Ostertagia ostertagiimembers
  • Tricho-dento-osseus-like syndrome in a Brown Swiss calfmembers
  • Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria in healthy slaughtered cattle and the abattoir members
  • Subclinical ketosis in dairy cows: prevalence and risk factorsmembers
  • Metabolic profiles of cow`s bloodmembers


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