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Outbreak of Q-fever in the UK
Avon, Gloucestershire, and Wiltshire Health Protection unit has received 5 reports of acute Q fever with onset dates between the end of May and 14 Jun 2007. All 5 confirmed cases are residents of the town of Cheltenham (Gloucestershire).

Q fever (caused by Coxiella burnetti) is thought to account for approximately one percent of community acquired pneumonia in the UK
each year and can result in serious complications such as endocarditis.

The main reservoir is sheep and other animals that can shed massive numbers in placental tissues. The main reservoirs are sheep, goats and cattle.

Transmission of Q fever occurs primarily
through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. The organism is robust and can survive in dust and animal litter for many weeks and in dried
blood for at least 6 months at room temperature.

The most infectious animal materials are the fluids of birth and afterbirth, followed by
blood, milk, urine and feces. Such infectious materials can be derived from livestock as above or from domestic animals, particularly parturient cats.

Source: www.promedmail.org


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BOVINE

Subclinical ketosis in dairy cows: prevalence and risk factorsmembers
Subclinical ketosis is commonly seen especially in dairy cows and grazing systems aand can become a serious and sometimes life threatening metabolic problem. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Subclinical ketosis (SCK) between 4 and 19 days in milk (DIM) in a grazing production system and investigate the importance of potential risk factors for SCK.

  • Metabolic profiles of cow`s bloodmembers
  • A novel ovine astrovirus associated with encephalitis and ganglionitismembers
  • Pharmacokinetics of an injectable long-acting praziquantel suspension in cattlemembers
  • Tulathromycin versus tildipirosin in experimental Mycoplasma bovis infection in calvesmembers
  • Tulathromycin versus tildipirosin in experimental Mycoplasma bovis infection in calvesmembers
  • Antibodies to bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in water buffalo and cattle in Australiamembers
  • Postpartum anoestrus in seasonally-calving dairy farms members
  • Long-term Effects of Pyrethrin and Cyfluthrin on Bull Reproductive Parametersmembers
  • Arthroscopy of the bovine antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal jointmembers
  • Degree of corneal anaesthesia after topical application of various drugsmembers
  • Improvement of the outcome in recumbent dairy cattlemembers
  • Secondary damage in downer cows - an underestimated problemmembers


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