Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Articles /     
 
New agent associated with feline ocular diseases identified
Scientists from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, detected a new agent associated with ocular disease in cats. The non-chlamydia felis chlamydia which was identified in 39% of the cats was 99 percent homologous to the sequence for Neochlamydia hartmannellae, an amebic endosymbiont. What does this mean?

To detect and characterize the full range of chlamydial infections in cats with ocular disease, Dr. Wolf von Bomhard from the Veterinary Faculty, University of Zurich, and colleagues used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, performed cytologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis and evaluated clinical information including status for feline herpesvirus-1 (FeHV-1).

As sample population the scientists extracted DNA from 226 conjunctival samples obtained from cats with clinically diagnosed keratitis or conjunctivitis and 30 conjunctival samples from healthy cats.

Then they performed PCR assays for the 16S rRNA gene specific for the order Chlamydiales and a new Chlamydophila felis (formerly Chlamydia psittaci) species-specific 23S rRNA gene. Seventy-four conjunctival samples they prepared with Romanowsky-type stain, grouped on the basis of inflammatory pattern, and screened them for chlamydial inclusions by use of immunohistochemical analysis. Clinical information and FeHV-1 status were recorded.

As results 26 (12 percent) specimens had positive results for the only known feline chlamydial pathogen, C felis. Surprisingly, an additional 88 (39 percent) were positive for non-C felis chlamydial DNA. Identification of non-C felis chlamydial DNA by direct sequencing revealed 16S rRNA gene sequences that were 99 percent homologous to the sequence for Neochlamydia hartmannellae, an amebic endosymbiont. Chlamydial prevalence was significantly higher in cats with ocular disease.

Application of a broad-range detection method resulted in identification of a new agent associated with ocular disease in cats. Finding chlamydia-like agents such as N hartmannellae in coinfections with their obligate amebic host, Hartmannella vermiformis, raises questions about the potential role of these microorganisms in causation or exacerbation of ocular disease in cats, the scientists concluded.

Source: American Journal of Veterinary Research 2003, Vol. 64, No. 11, pp. 1421 - 1428.
www.animalhealth.bayer.com/



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

ARTICLES

Pharmacokinetics of quinocetone in ducks after two routes of administrationmembers
Quinocetone (QCT), an antimicrobial growth promoter, is widely used in food-producing animals. However, information about pharmacokinetics (PK) of QCT in ducks still remains unavailable up to now. In this study, QCT and its major metabolites (1-desoxyquinocetone, di-desoxyquinocetone and 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic) in ducks were studied using a simple and sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS assay.

  • Novel antibiotic treatment of zebrafish mycobacteriosismembers
  • Canine mammary tumours as model for hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humansmembers
  • Treatment of corneal ulceration in stranded California sea lions members
  • Effects of substrates and stress on placental metabolismmembers
  • Vaccine regimens against caecal Salmonella Typhimurium colonisation in laying hensmembers
  • Presumptive keratoglobus in a raptormembers
  • Monitored, controlled long-term anaesthesia in broiler chickenmembers
  • Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin in alpacasmembers
  • Use and effect of hand antiseptics in veterinary practicemembers
  • Two dogs with cold agglutinin activitymembers
  • Mechanical ventilation and blood gases and blood pressure in rattlesnakesmembers
  • Infectious haemolytic anemia in an orphaned juvenile female platypus members


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved