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University of Missouri tests glucose monitoring system
Diabetes mellitus is an increasing problem especially in small animals, and still the monitoring at home can be a serious problem. Veterinarians at the University examined the feasibility of using continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) in different species (dogs, cats, and horses) and found it very useful.



The systems have a sensor in a small flexible needle that is inserted under the skin. The sensor is attached, via wires, to a recording device, and continually monitors the level of glucose in normal fluid under the skin, which then reflects the level of glucose in the blood.

The advantages of CGMS, according to university investigators:

•The animal does not have to be repeatedly handled and have multiple blood samples drawn.

•The animal can be at home and will be more likely to eat regular amounts of food and exercise normally.

•Levels of glucose can be determined every five minutes over a 24-hour period.

During the study, normal and diabetic dogs and cats showed little discomfort from the sensors or recording devices. Researchers found good correlation between CGMS and actual blood glucose levels, concluding use of CGMS in animals will be useful for glucose monitoring in the future.

Source: University tests glucose monitoring system. In: DVM Newsmagazine November 25, 2003. www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/





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